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Untitled Document

Introduction

The paradox of progress

Due to progress in science and technology - and the increasingly stringent legislation that has resulted – today's agri-foodstuffs sector must respect ever stricter standards and increasingly rigorous quality control and monitoring procedures. Yet paradoxically, over the past decade there has also been an increasing number of food alerts – BSE, dioxin, listeria, salmonella – creating a genuine crisis of confidence among consumers. Research on food safety and quality must therefore be a priority.

From the farm to the fork

Since the devastation caused by the bovine spongiform encephalitis crisis, the Union has, so to speak, 'taken the bull by the horns' in carrying out a thorough review and draconian restructuring of its political responsibilities in the area of food safety. Research on this subject under the Sixth Framework Programme will be in line with this goal.

Objectives

  • To establish the integrated scientific and technological bases needed to develop an environmentally friendly production and distribution chain of safer, healthier and more varied food including crops, meat and sea food.
  • To improve understanding of the link between food and health.
  • To control food-related risks, relying in particular on biotechnology tools and the results of post-genomic research.
  • To control health risks associated with environ-mental changes.

Support for Research

Community action will cover research in the following fields:

  • Production methods and processes (including knowledge of biotechnolgies) for foodstuffs and animal feed which are safer, healthier, more nutritional, functional and varied, and environmentally friendly, based on systems such as integrated production, lower input farming and organic farming.
  • The epidemiology of food-related diseases and allergies, including methods of analysis of food-related allergies, in particular the impact of diet on children's health;
  • The impact on health of new and/or functional foods, products resulting from organic farming, foods containing genetically modified organisms, and those arising from recent biotechnology developments.
  • 'Traceability' processes throughout the production chain, relating in particular to GMOs and similar products.
  • Methods of analysis, detection and control of chemical contaminants and existing or emerging pathogenic micro-organisms (such as viruses, bacteria, yeasts, fungi, parasites, and new agents of the prion type, including the development of ante-mortem diagnostic tests for BSE and scrapie).
  • The impact on human health of animal feed, in particular products containing GMOs, and the use of sub-products of various origin.
  • Environmental health risks (chemical, biological and physical) linked to the food chain (including the cumulative risks of authorised substances, transmission routes to human beings, long-term effects and exposure to small doses, impact on particularly vulnerable groups, especially children), the impact of local ecological disasters and of pollution on food safety.

To find out more European White Paper on Food Safety http://ec.europa.eu/dgs/ health_consumer/library/pub/ pub06_en.pdf

Dossier on food safety at the Europa Research website http://ec.europa.eu/research/ briefings/foodsafety_en.html

Site of the European Food Safety Authority: http://www.efsa.europa.eu

Site of the pan-European conference on food safety and quality (organised by the FAO and WHO and held in Budapest in February 2002) http://www.foodsafetyforum.org/ paneuropean/index_en.htm

Site of the European ENTRANSFOOD network on GMOs http://www.entransfood.nl/

Budget

€ 685 million

Untitled Document

Introduction

The paradox of progress

Due to progress in science and technology - and the increasingly stringent legislation that has resulted – today's agri-foodstuffs sector must respect ever stricter standards and increasingly rigorous quality control and monitoring procedures. Yet paradoxically, over the past decade there has also been an increasing number of food alerts – BSE, dioxin, listeria, salmonella – creating a genuine crisis of confidence among consumers. Research on food safety and quality must therefore be a priority.

From the farm to the fork

Since the devastation caused by the bovine spongiform encephalitis crisis, the Union has, so to speak, 'taken the bull by the horns' in carrying out a thorough review and draconian restructuring of its political responsibilities in the area of food safety. Research on this subject under the Sixth Framework Programme will be in line with this goal.

Objectives

  • To establish the integrated scientific and technological bases needed to develop an environmentally friendly production and distribution chain of safer, healthier and more varied food including crops, meat and sea food.
  • To improve understanding of the link between food and health.
  • To control food-related risks, relying in particular on biotechnology tools and the results of post-genomic research.
  • To control health risks associated with environ-mental changes.

Support for Research

Community action will cover research in the following fields:

  • Production methods and processes (including knowledge of biotechnolgies) for foodstuffs and animal feed which are safer, healthier, more nutritional, functional and varied, and environmentally friendly, based on systems such as integrated production, lower input farming and organic farming.
  • The epidemiology of food-related diseases and allergies, including methods of analysis of food-related allergies, in particular the impact of diet on children's health;
  • The impact on health of new and/or functional foods, products resulting from organic farming, foods containing genetically modified organisms, and those arising from recent biotechnology developments.
  • 'Traceability' processes throughout the production chain, relating in particular to GMOs and similar products.
  • Methods of analysis, detection and control of chemical contaminants and existing or emerging pathogenic micro-organisms (such as viruses, bacteria, yeasts, fungi, parasites, and new agents of the prion type, including the development of ante-mortem diagnostic tests for BSE and scrapie).
  • The impact on human health of animal feed, in particular products containing GMOs, and the use of sub-products of various origin.
  • Environmental health risks (chemical, biological and physical) linked to the food chain (including the cumulative risks of authorised substances, transmission routes to human beings, long-term effects and exposure to small doses, impact on particularly vulnerable groups, especially children), the impact of local ecological disasters and of pollution on food safety.

To find out more European White Paper on Food Safety http://ec.europa.eu/dgs/ health_consumer/library/pub/ pub06_en.pdf

Dossier on food safety at the Europa Research website http://ec.europa.eu/research/ briefings/foodsafety_en.html

Site of the European Food Safety Authority: http://www.efsa.europa.eu

Site of the pan-European conference on food safety and quality (organised by the FAO and WHO and held in Budapest in February 2002) http://www.foodsafetyforum.org/ paneuropean/index_en.htm

Site of the European ENTRANSFOOD network on GMOs http://www.entransfood.nl/

Budget

€ 685 million

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Untitled Document

More information

Current & Previous activities

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