Success stories

Highlights from some of the breakthrough innovations supported by the EU funding instruments which make up the European Innovation Council pilot

Robots in a rush: time-aware AI aids human-machine interaction

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Time is an illusion, breakfast time doubly so. In future, human workers might not be alone in experiencing frenetic mornings thanks to EU-funded researchers who have equipped robots with human-like time perception capabilities – and tested them in the kitchen.

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Forecasting the coronavirus pandemic with help from EU projects

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The whole world is currently dealing with a novel coronavirus pandemic and we all want to try to understand what the future may hold. Using computer-based models would allow us to keep up with the spread and evolution of the pandemic.

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Organ-on-Chip technology: a step towards more effective therapies

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Janny van den Eijnden-van Raaij, the managing director of hDMT (Institute for Human Organ and Disease Model Technologies) tells us more about how Organ-on-Chip technology can mimic human physiology and the project ORCHID (ORgan-on-Chip In Development)funded by the Future and Emerging Technologies (FET) program.

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Interview with a FET Innovator in the service of oncologic patients

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Maurizio Aiello is an innovator, the CEO of the biotechnology company, React4life that helps scientists in the field of cancer research. He has been involved in several EU-funded projects: B2B, a Future and Emerging Technologies (FET) project and MOOD, which benefited from the European Innovation Council (EIC) Accelerator.

In this interview, we asked Maurizio about his career path, the challenges that start-up companies are facing with and his personal experience about how bold ideas can be turned into reality by the help of the European Commission in order to improve therapeutic methods and the life expectancy of oncologic patients.

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The bionic hand: how a crazy idea has become a medical breakthrough

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When we did the first implantation in 2008, the real question was: can we give back sensations to an amputee using electrodes implanted in peripheral nerves?

When we did the first implantation in 2008, the real question was: can we give back sensations to an amputee using electrodes implanted in peripheral nerves? At that time we absolutely didn’t know, it was a bet. Now we have shown we can do it. We have demonstrated that the patient can use this information during real tasks, so it has an impact on everyday life. The current step is to make this thing clinically usable for many patients for a long time.

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FLIPT: how to replace plastic with the creation of a sustainable and resistant fibre

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The project takes inspiration from spiders and silkworms and on how these animals are able to create a high performance natural fibre (sustainable, degradable and elastic) in a way which is over 1000 times more energy efficient than industrially manufactured ones.

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Extending lives with the EIC

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The NeuHeart project seeks to extend decidedly the life expectancy of patients facing heart transplantations. An innovative neuroprosthesis has been developed to tackle the unsolved issue of lost neural connection from the vagus nerve in transplanted hearts.

Heart transplantation is one of the most remarkable achievement in the history of medicine as well as the last chance for many patients affected by end-stage heart failure.

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A new way to find better medication

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How can we better predict how new medications act in the human body? This was the main question when we started our FET Open project Body on a Chip (BoC) in 2012.

Too many new and promising drugs fail in very late stages of the development process because they are not efficient or produce unwanted - sometimes even dangerous - side effects.

The Swiss company InSphero AG developed sand-grain-sized 3D microtissues which mimic human organs like the liver, the pancreas or tumours to solve this problem.

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Paolo Dario on bio-robotics and the potential of disruptive scientific thinking

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Paolo Dario is one of the leading European researcher in bio-robotics and a prominent ambassador of the Future and Emergent Technologies (FET) programme.

He has contributed to some of the most outstanding achievements in this field as for instance the development of neuro-controlled upper limb prosthesis for amputees.

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Making a splash for a brighter future

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It is known simply as 'The Penguin'. The intriguing name belongs to a platform floating on the Atlantic Ocean off the Orkney Islands, which is at the forefront of exciting moves to harness the power of water.

'The Penguin' can produce energy thanks to the movement of the waves, as 'Futuris' reporter Julián López Gómez discovered when he visited the islands off the north of Scotland.

With 75% of the earth's surface covered by water, wave energy has huge potential.

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Wello

Restoring sensory feedback in lower-limb amputees

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After successful completion of the FET-Open project NEBIAS, that managed to develop a ground-breaking technology enabling upper limb amputees to intuitively control and feel artificial prosthesis as they were natural parts of their body, the SensAgain project takes a further step forward.

Now, the aim is to verify whether the innovation generated during NEBIAS could be exploited to provide clinically effective devices for lower-limb amputees as well.

SensAgain: Restoring sensory feedback in lower-limb amputees

SensArs Neuroprosthetics

Powerful graphene batteries

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Skeleton Technologies is an Estonian start-up that has patented and commercialised ultracapacitors - very powerful batteries made from graphene. Ultracapacitors are especially useful in the automotive and aerospace industry. Since 2015 the company has raised €38 million to build Europe’s largest ultracapacitor factory in Germany.

Skeleton Technologies

InnoEnergy link spurs Skeleton growth

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