Reinventing Regenerative Medicine in Edinburgh

The Scottish Centre for Regenerative Medicine (SCRM) will play a key role in the development of Life Sciences in Scotland, combining research, manufacturing and commercialisation of stem cell lines.

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The SCRM project will develop about 9 000 m² of research facility within the University of Edinburgh's BioQuarter, itself a key strategic project which brings together world leaders in regenerative medicine research and provides an optimum environment for research, scientific collaboration and development.

Raising the profile of Life Sciences

The SCRM project will be dedicated to supporting enterprises and research networks, enabling the development of new products and services, and lead to spin out companies. It will play a key role in the development of Life Sciences in Scotland and contribute to the achievement of critical mass, attracting further investments. The project will also interact with existing life sciences companies, generate new high growth companies as a result of commercialisation activity and provide opportunities for networking and collaboration.

The infrastructure investment at the SCRM comprises approximately 9 000 m² of internal floor space for 280 bench based research and translational research staff. This area includes 5 570 m² of pure research, research support, office and administrative space, a biomedical research facility of 750 m² for in vivo work in non-human models, a 930 m² clean-room facility for scale-up development and manufacturing of cells and tissue products to GMP standard licensed for clinical trials and therapeutic applications. A further 1 750 m² is set aside as plant and ancillary zones. All is fitted-out with scientific equipment for the laboratories, vivarium and GMP areas; IT infrastructure and desk top hardware and general building furniture and fittings.

Benefiting the community

The key output indicators for the project includes support to 26 enterprises and 20 research networks and collaborations. Ninety-one new products and services will be developed by supporting enterprises and research centres. During the three year implementation phase, 396 jobs are expected to be created; and during the operation period of the project, 806 jobs will be created.

It is also estimated that the project could generate €822 million of research income between 2007/8 and 2028/29, and €157 million in licensing turnover. A further 19 spin-outs will be created by 2029 in the Edinburgh and Lothian area, with 526 people employed full-time and an estimated turnover of €57 million per annum.

The project is run by the University of Edinburgh as project leader, with Roslin Cells, a company set up by the Roslin Foundation, University of Edinburgh and Scottish Enterprise, the Scottish Funding Council and the Medical Research Council. The direct beneficiary from the SCRM will be the University of Edinburgh. Wider beneficiaries include the life sciences sector in the surrounding cluster and in the wider Scotland area.

Draft date

03/10/2011