Horizon 2020
The EU Framework Programme for Research and Innovation

Featured projects

E.g., 11-12-2017
E.g., 11-12-2017
  • Gadgets and wearables that support a healthy lifestyle are very hip today, but not always very attractive for the elderly. This is where ELF@Home comes in. It empowers people to manage their own health by self-check, self-care and self-fitness.
  • EU-funded researchers are advancing a novel form of cancer therapy described as a ‘magic bullet’ against certain types of tumours. Their work promises to lead to more personalised and effective treatments for breast, ovarian and other forms of cancer over the coming years.
  • Chemotherapy can have a considerable impact on patients’ quality of life, causing nausea or hair loss as well as depression and anxiety. More personalised care could help many patients and even improve outcomes. The EU-funded project eSMART is putting a mobile phone-based remote patient monitoring system to the test.
  • You can’t see it, you can’t touch it, nor is it something you could hear, taste or smell. Dark matter is all around us, and its mass produces measurable gravitational effects. Other than that, it interacts with the visible universe even less than previously thought, according to the results of recent EU-funded research.
  • Africa is particularly vulnerable to disease outbreaks, and the continent has large gaps in preventative healthcare. So it makes sense to build regional capacity to find solutions to these health problems. An EU-funded project trained new graduates in Africa to develop health research programmes and share scientific knowledge.
  • Looking for a novel way to visualise the ocean? Think fish. Arrays of sensitive cells on their skin — so-called lateral lines — enable them to perceive water movements by detecting subtle changes in pressure. The LAKHSMI project is developing new monitoring and imaging technology based on this principle.
  • An archaeological project has challenged assumptions that the Early Iron Age wine trade was simply a coastal activity. Through analysis of ancient wine containers found in Central Europe, an EU-funded researcher has asserted that early European trade was more complex than previously thought.
  • The TIME SCALE project is investigating the feasibility of growing food crops in space and whether this might provide astronauts with long-term supplies of food and oxygen. The findings could lay the foundations for a manned mission to Mars and also lead to more sustainable production back on Earth.
  • To ensure food and energy security for today’s growing populations, governments increasingly turn to earth observation. Remotely-sensed data can provide valuable information on crops, livestock, woodlands and fires. Innovative, EU-funded research partnerships helped reinforce African capacities in this area.
  • Case studies carried out in Europe and Latin America as part of the EU-funded POLICYMIX project have shed new light on how the right mix of forest governance policies can help to conserve biodiversity and boost local economies.

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