Featured projects about European Research infrastructures, incl. e-infrastructures

E.g., 23-03-2018
E.g., 23-03-2018
  • New booklet shows how EU research and innovation funding impacts your daily life

    The European Commission has published a new booklet showing a few examples where EU support for research and innovation is making a real difference in the lives of citizens and society as a whole. It is aimed at all age groups so everyone can understand the good work EU funding can do.
  • Arctic station network boosts climate change research

    EU-funded project INTERACT has built a network of Arctic research stations, allowing them to coordinate and share resources more efficiently. The network aims to boost the scope and quantity of research on the Arctic, which serves as a bellwether of global changes to climate, biodiversity and land use.
  • Launch of the READ project for the automated recognition and enrichment of documents

    The overall objective of the EU-funded READ project is to implement a Virtual Research Environment where archivists, humanities scholars, computer scientists and volunteers are collaborating with the ultimate goal of boosting research, innovation, development and usage of cutting edge technology for the automated recognition, transcription, indexing and enrichment of handwritten archival documents.
  • Democratising and enhancing research with citizen scientists

    An EU-funded consortium is bridging the gap between science and the general public, fostering real and virtual environments in which researchers and citizens collaborate on cutting-edge initiatives for the benefit of both science and society.
  • African e-science on the fast track

    Africa’s ICT infrastructures are fast evolving, creating exciting opportunities for researchers keen to join the global e-science community. Dedicated European-African initiatives are exploring the potential and engaging with stakeholders to raise awareness of the possibilities. An EU-funded project has assisted them in this task.
  • A giant leap for gamma ray astronomy

    The ability to observe very high energy gamma radiation has opened a new window on the universe, and researchers around the world are keen to seize the new opportunities it offers. As part of an EU-funded project, they have created an international alliance to move beyond current experimental instruments towards a major telescope array for this new type of observation.
  • Sharing infrastructure for better science: Africa and the EU

    Research infrastructures provide the tools scientists need to understand the world and, in some cases, make it a better place. But these resources – from telescopes to biobanks, and from museum archives to wave energy test sites – cost more than most countries can afford. The EU-funded PAERIP project has started the ball rolling for new partnerships to share resources between Europe and Africa
  • Uniting experts in accelerator technology

    Physicists use particle accelerators to study the nature of matter and energy. These large machines guide charged particles through a magnetic field in a hollow evacuated tube and accelerate them by an electric field.
  • Pioneering research to promote sustainable forestry

    The demand for wood products and services is increasing worldwide due to economic and climate policy driving forces. It is therefore imperative for experts in forestry research to develop a common framework which could facilitate interactions between different areas of expertise and the exchange of scientific knowledge.
  • EU research helps fish farmers become more competitive

    Aquaculture holds the promise of reducing the need to catch wild fish. Global demand for fish is increasing, putting many species in danger from overfishing. Fish farming, or aquaculture, is taking some of the pressure off these stocks – half of the fish consumed globally is now produced at fish farms.