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Capacity Building in the field of higher education

This action which aims to support the modernisation, accessibility and internationalisation of higher education in the Partner Countries is to be carried out in the context of the priorities identified in the Communications “New EU Consensus on Development”1 and the “European Higher Education in the World” Communication2.

It is implemented within the framework of the external policies of the EU, defined by the financial instruments of the European Union which support this action, namely the:

  • European Neighbourhood Instrument (ENI)3
  • Development Cooperation Instrument (DCI)4
  • Instrument for Pre-accession Assistance (IPA)5
  • European Development Fund

This action contributes to the development of sustainable and inclusive socio-economic growth in Partner Countries and should ensure development and EU external actions objectives and principles, including national ownership, social cohesion, equity, proper geographical balance and diversity. Special attention will be given to the least developed countries, universities in more remote areas, as well as to disadvantaged students from poor socio-economic backgrounds and to students with special needs.

The following section should be read in conjunction with Annex I of this present Guide (Specific rules and  information relating to Capacity Building in the field of higher education).

 

What is a Capacity-building Project?

Capacity-building Projects are transnational cooperation projects based on multilateral partnerships, primarily between higher education institutions (HEIs) from Programme and eligible Partner Countries financed through the above-mentioned instruments. They can also involve non‑academic partners to strengthen the links with society and business and to reinforce the systemic impact of the projects. Through structured cooperation, exchange of experience and good practices and individual mobility, Capacity-building Projects aim to:

  • support the modernisation, accessibility and internationalisation of higher education in the eligible Partner Countries;
  • support eligible Partner Countries to address the challenges facing their higher education institutions and systems, including those of quality, relevance, equity of access, planning, delivery, management and governance;
  • contribute to cooperation between the EU and the eligible Partner Countries (and amongst the eligible Partner Countries);
  • promote voluntary convergence with EU developments in higher education;
  • promote people-to-people contacts, intercultural awareness and understanding.

These objectives are pursued in the eligible Partner Countries, through actions that:

  • improve the quality of higher education and enhance its relevance for the labour market and society;
  • improve the level of competences and skills in HEIs by developing new and innovative education programmes;
  • enhance the management, governance and innovation capacities, as well as the internationalisation of HEIs;
  • increase the capacities of national authorities to modernise their higher education systems, by supporting to the definition, implementation and monitoring of reform policies
  • foster regional integration and cooperation across different regions6 of the world through joint initiatives, sharing of good practices and cooperation.

Two categories of Capacity-building projects are supported:

Joint Projects: aimed at producing outcomes that benefit principally and directly the organisations from eligible Partner Countries involved in the project. These projects typically focus on three different types of activities:

  • curriculum development;
  • modernisation of governance, management and functioning of HEIs;
  • strengthening of relations between HEIs and the wider economic and social environment.

Structural Projects: aimed at producing an impact on higher education systems and promoting reforms at national and/or regional level in the eligible Partner Countries. These projects typically focus on two different categories of activities:

  • modernisation of policies, governance and management of higher education systems;
  • strengthening of relations between higher education systems and the wider economic and social environment.

Capacity-building projects can be implemented as:

  • National projects, i.e. projects involving institutions from only one eligible Partner Country;
  • Multi-country projects within one single region, involving at least two countries from this region;
  • Multi-country projects involving more than one region, involving at least one country from each region concerned.

 

 

Which Activities are supported under this Action?

Erasmus+ offers a great deal of flexibility in terms of the activities that a Capacity-building Project can implement, as long as the proposal demonstrates that these activities are the most appropriate to reach the objectives defined for the project.

Joint Projects may typically carry out a wide range of activities, such as:

  • development, testing and adaptation of:
    • curricula, courses, learning materials and tools;
    • learning and teaching methodologies and pedagogical approaches, especially those delivering key competences and basic skills, language skills, entrepreneurship education and focusing on the use of ICT;
    • new forms of practical training schemes and study of real-life cases in business and industry;
    • university-enterprise cooperation, including the creation of business start-ups;
    • new forms of learning and providing education and training, notably strategic use of open and flexible learning, virtual mobility, open educational resources and better exploitation of the ICT potential;
    • guidance, counselling and coaching methods and tools;
    • tools and methods for professionalization and professional development of academic and administrative staff;
    • quality assurance at programme and institution level;
    • new governance and management systems and structures;
    • modern university services e.g. for financial management, international relations, student counselling and guidance, academic affairs and research;
  • strengthening of the internationalisation of HEI and the capacity to network effectively in research, scientific and technological innovation (international openness of curricula, student services, inter-institutional mobility schemes, scientific cooperation and knowledge transfer, etc.);
  • upgrading of facilities necessary to the implementation of innovative practices (e.g. for new curricula and teaching methods, for the development of new services, etc.);
  • organisation of staff trainings involving teaching and support staff, technicians as well as university administrators and managers.

 

Curriculum reform projects, in particular, are expected to include training for teaching staff and address related issues such as quality assurance and employability of graduates through links to the labour market. Study programmes must be officially accredited before the end of the project time life. The teaching of new or updated courses must start during the life-time of the project with an adequate number of students and retrained teachers and has to take place during at least one third of the project duration. Training during curriculum reform projects can also target administrative personnel such as library staff, laboratory staff and IT staff.

Structural Projects may typically carry out a wide range of activities, such as:

  • strengthening of internationalisation of higher education systems;
  • introduction of Bologna-type reforms (three-level cycle system, quality assurance, evaluation, etc.);
  • implementation of transparency tools such as credit systems, accreditation procedures, guidelines for the recognition of prior and non-formal learning etc.;
  • establishment of National Qualification Frameworks;
  • development and implementation of internal and external quality assurance systems/guidelines;
  • development and implementation of new approaches and tools for policy making and monitoring, including the establishment of representative bodies, organisations or associations;
  • strengthening the integration of education, research and innovation.

In more concrete terms, these activities can include:

  • surveys and studies on specific reform issues;
  • policy and expert advice;
  • organisation of conferences, seminars, workshops, round tables (which should result in operational conclusions and recommendations);
  • organisation of staff trainings on policy issues;
  • organisation of staff trainings (which may include the production of training manuals and guidelines) involving teaching and support staff, technicians as well as university administrators and managers;
  • organisation of awareness-raising campaigns.

 

What is the role of organisations participating in a Capacity-building Project?

Depending on their objectives, Capacity-building projects should involve the most appropriate and diverse range of partners in order to benefit from their different experiences, profiles and specific expertise and to produce relevant and high quality project results. It will be important to ensure an equitable and active involvement of the different partners based on a suitable distribution of tasks and a clear demonstration of networking capacities and in order to increase impact, to be able to draw on all the different levels of the partnership and not just on individual participation.

Partners must submit mandates7 signed between the coordinator and each partner, confirming that they grant power of attorney to the coordinator, to act in their name and for their account in signing the possible agreement and its subsequent riders with the Education, Audiovisual and Culture Executive Agency.

According to the scope and objectives of the Action, participating organisations from eligible Partner Countries are intended to be the target of the Capacity-building project. The activities and outcomes described in the proposal must be geared to benefit the eligible Partner Countries, their higher education institutions and systems.

HEIs from the eligible Partner Countries are encouraged to act as applicants, provided that they have the financial and operational capacity required.

Participating organisations from Programme Countries bring their expertise and experience in relation to the objectives of the project. Their role is to contribute towards achieving the objectives of the project and the needs of these institutions should not therefore feature in the project's design. Those organisations are eligible to receive a share of the budget in relation to the costs incurred by their role.

Additionally the Capacity-building in the field of higher education project may also benefit from the involvement of associated partners (optional). These organisations (for instance non-academic partners) contribute indirectly to the implementation of specific tasks/activities and/or support the dissemination and sustainability of the project. Such contribution may for example take the form of knowledge and skills transfer, the provision of complementary courses or possibilities for secondment or placement. Associated partners do not count for the minimum number of higher education institutions or Ministries required for the partnership composition. For contractual management issues, “associated partners” are not considered as part of the consortium and therefore are not considered as beneficiaries and their costs are not taken into account for the calculation of the EU grant.

 

What is the role of organisations participating in a Capacity-building project in the field of higher education?

Applicant/coordinator: a participating organisation that submits the project proposal on behalf of all the partners. The coordinator has the full responsibility to ensure that the project is implemented in accordance with the agreement. Its coordinating covers the following duties:

  • represents and acts on behalf of the project partners towards the European Commission;
  • bears the financial and legal responsibility for the proper operational, administrative and financial implementation of the entire project;
  • coordinates the project in cooperation with project partners.

Full partners: are those participating organisations from Programme or Partner Countries which contribute actively to the achievement of the Capacity Building project's objectives. Each full partner must sign a mandate to confer to the coordinating organisation the responsibility of acting as main beneficiary and act in his name during the implementation of the project

Associated partners (optional): Capacity-building projects can involve associated partners who contribute to the implementation of specific project tasks/activities or support the dissemination and sustainability of the project. For contractual management issues, “associated partners” are not considered as part of the partnership, and they do not receive funding, neither are they considered as regards the minimum requirements for consortium composition. However their involvement and role in the project and different activities have to be clearly described.

Affiliated entities (optional): Organisations which contribute to the achievement of project objectives and activities. Affiliated entities must be identified in the grant application and satisfy the requirements as described in Annex III (Glossary of terms) of this Programme Guide.

 

What are the criteria used to assess a Capacity-building project?

Listed below are the formal criteria that a higher education Capacity-building project must respect in order to be eligible for an Erasmus+ grant:

 

Eligibility criteria

Eligible Partner Countries

Partner Countries belonging to Regions 1 to 4 and 6 to 11 included (see section "Eligible Countries" in Part A of this Guide).

Eligible participating organisations8

A participating organisation can be:

  • any public or private organisation, with its affiliated entities (if any), offering full programmes leading to higher education degrees and recognised diplomas at tertiary education qualifications level9 (defined as higher education institution and recognised as such by the competent authorities);

or

  • any public or private organisation, with its affiliated entities (if any), active in the labour market or in the fields of education, training and youth. For example, such organisation can be:
    • a public, private small medium or large enterprise (including social enterprises);
    • a public body at local, regional or national level (including ministries);
    • a social partner or other representative of working life, including chambers of commerce, craft/professional associations and trade unions;
    • a research institute;
    • a foundation;
    • a school/institute (on any level, from pre-school to upper secondary education, including vocational education and adult education);
    • a non-profit organisation, association, NGO (including national or international associations or networks of higher education institutions, students or teachers associations, etc.);
    • a cultural organisation, library, museum;
    • a body providing career guidance, professional counselling and information services.

Each participating organisation must be established in a Programme Country or in an eligible Partner Country.

Higher education institutions (HEIs) located in a Programme Country must hold a valid Erasmus Charter for Higher Education (ECHE). An ECHE is not required for participating HEIs in eligible Partner Countries.

Associations or organisations of higher education institutions dedicated to the promotion, improvement and reform of higher education as well as to co-operation within Europe and between Europe and other parts of the world are eligible. If such associations, organisations or networks also cover other education sectors and training, the main focus of their activities must be on higher education, which must be clearly reflected in the organisation statutes and governance structures. An association, organisation or network of higher education institutions will count as one legal entity/partner institution, meaning that it will be treated as one entity from the country where the headquarter is based. These organisations will not be considered as HEIs. Only those members which are established in the Programme or eligible Partner Countries can benefit from the grant.

International governmental organisations may participate as partners in Capacity-building projects on a self-financing basis.

Specific provision for Ukraine: In the case of Ukraine, eligible Higher Education Institutions are only those recognised by the Ministry of Education and Science of Ukraine (for further information please contact the National Erasmus+ Office in Ukraine).

Who can apply?

The following types of participating organisations can apply for a grant: 

  • a higher education institution;
  • an association or organisation of higher education institutions;
  • only for Structural Projects: a legally recognized national or international rector, teacher or student organisation.

established in a Programme or in an eligible Partner Country.

This organisation applies on behalf of all participating organisations involved in the project.

Exception: participating organisations from Libya and Syria (Region 3) as well as from the Russian Federation (Region 4) cannot act as applicants.

Number and profile of participating organisations

Capacity-building projects must respect all of the following criteria:

 

For projects addressing one Partner Country only (national projects):

One eligible Partner Country and at least two Programme Countries must be involved in the project.

These projects must include, as full partners,  a minimum number of HEIs, as follows:

  • minimum one HEI from at least two of the Programme Countries taking part in the project;
  • minimum three HEIs from the Partner Country taking part in the project.
  • projects must include at least as many Partner Country HEIs as there are Programme Country HEIs.

Exception: in Partner Countries where the number of higher education institutions is lower than 5 in the whole country or in cases where one single institution represents more than 50% of the overall student population of the country, applications counting only one HEI for those countries will be accepted.

 

For projects addressing two or more Partner Countries (multi-country projects):

At least two eligible Partner Countries and at least two Programme Countries must be involved in the project. Partner Countries can be from the same region10 or from different regions covered by the Action.

These projects must include, as full partners, a minimum number of HEIs, as follows:

  • minimum one HEI from at least two of the Programme Countries taking part in the project;
  • minimum two HEIs from each Partner Country taking part in the project;
  • projects must include at least as many Partner Country HEIs as there are Programme Country HEIs.

Exception: in Partner Countries where the number of higher education institutions is lower than 5 in the whole country or in cases where one single institution represents more than 50% of the overall student population of the country, applications counting only one HEI for those countries will be accepted on the condition that the projects includes at least as many Partner Country HEIs as there are Programme Country HEIs.

 

Additional specific criteria applying to:

  • Structural Projects:  projects must also involve, as full partners, the Ministries responsible for higher education in each of the eligible Partner Countries targeted by the project.
  • Projects involving partners from Region 4 (Russian Federation) must involve at least another Partner Country.
  • Projects involving partners from Region 8 (Latin America), must involve at least two Partner Countries from that region in the project.

 

Other criteria

 

Where an association, organisation or network of higher education institutions is involved, the requirements for the minimum number of participating organizations indicated above must be fulfilled, counting the association / organisation / network as only one partner from the country where the headquarters is based. Please note that these organisations cannot be considered as HEIs.

Duration of project

Capacity-building Projects can last two or three years. The duration must be chosen at application stage, based on the objective of the project and on the type of activities foreseen over time.

Only under exceptional circumstances, one extension of the eligibility period of maximum 12 months, may be granted if it becomes impossible for the coordinator to complete the project within the scheduled period.

Where to apply?

To the Education, Audiovisual and Culture Executive Agency, based in Brussels.

When to apply?

Applicants have to submit their grant application by 7 February at 12:00 (midday Brussels time) for projects starting on 15 November of the same year or 15 January of the following year.

How to apply?

The application must be introduced in compliance with the modalities described in Part C of this Guide.

 

Applicant organisations might also be assessed against exclusion and selection criteria. For more information please consult Part C of this Guide.

 

Award criteria

The project will be assessed in a two-step procedure against the following criteria:

STEP 1

Relevance of the project

 

(maximum 30 points)

 

  • The proposal and the results foreseen are in line with the objectives of the Capacity-Building action in the target country/ies;
  • The proposal clearly addresses the thematic national or regional priorities set by the programme for its target country/ies or region(s);
  • The proposal explains why the planned activities and expected results meet the needs of the target groups in the best way;
  • The proposal inscribes itself in the modernisation, development and internationalisation strategy of the targeted higher education institutions and is in line with the development strategies for higher education in the eligible Partner Countries, including a greater attention to inclusion, diversity and socio-economically disadvantaged participants where relevant;
  • The objectives of the proposal are clear, realistic and appropriate, based on a genuine and adequate needs analysis;
  • The proposal is innovative and /or complementary to other initiatives or projects already carried out under the present or past actions;
  • The proposal demonstrates that similar results could not be achieved through national, regional or local funding.

Quality of the project design and implementation

 

(maximum 30 points)

 

 

  • The activities proposed over the lifetime of the project are of high quality, pertinent and appropriate to achieve the objectives and foreseen results;
  • The proposed methodology is innovative, feasible and appropriate to achieve the foreseen results;
  • The proposal is cost-effective and allocates appropriate resources to each activity;
  • The overall project design ensures consistency between project objectives, methodology, activities and budget proposed;
  • The work plan is clear and realistic, with well-defined activities, realistic time-lines, clear deliverables and milestones. It demonstrates a logical and sound planning capacity and includes appropriate phases for preparation, implementation, evaluation, follow-up and dissemination of results;
  • Challenges/risks of the proposal are clearly identified and mitigating actions properly addressed. Quality control measures, including indicators and benchmarks, are in place to ensure that the project implementation is of high quality, completed in time and on budget. Reliable sources are given for verification of indicators to measure the outcomes of the action.

Quality of the project team and the cooperation arrangements

 

(maximum 20 points)

 

 

  • The proposal involves a strong and complementary partnership of higher education institutions;
  • The project team has the necessary skills, experience, expertise and management support to successfully deliver all aspects of the proposal;
  • Where relevant, the proposal also includes the most appropriate and diverse range of non-academic partners, in order to benefit from their different experiences, profiles and specific expertise;
  • The distribution of responsibilities and tasks is clear, appropriate, and demonstrates the commitment and active contribution of all participating organisations in relation to their specific expertise and capacity;
  • An effective mechanism is proposed to ensure good coordination, decision making and communication between the participating organisations, participants and any other relevant stakeholder;
  • The participating organisations from eligible Partner Countries are satisfactorily involved in the implementation of the action and decision making (including measures for any conflict resolution);
  • The proposal involves higher education institutions that have not benefited from support for Capacity Building in the past.

Impact and sustainability

 

(maximum 20 points)

 

 

  • The proposal is likeky to have a substantial impact on the capacities of participating organisations (notably higher education institutions) in the eligible Partner Countries, in particular on the development and modernisation of higher education, to assist them in opening themselves up to society at large, the labour market and the wider world and to support their capacity for international cooperation;
  • The proposal will produce multiplier effects outside the participating organisations at local/regional/national or international level. Measures will be put in place to assess the effective impact achieved by the project;
  • The dissemination plan during and beyond the project lifetime is clear and efficient, with appropriate resources identified in each of the participating organisations, to ensure high quality dissemination of project experiences and outputs to relevant stakeholders;
  • The proposal will ensure a real sustainability of the proposed activities and outputs after the project lifetime, in particular through attracting co-funding or other forms of support. It will also ensure the mainstreaming and effective use/implementation of the project results.

 

During the first step of the assessment stage, applications may score up to 100 points. To be considered for funding, proposals must score at least 60 points in total and - out of these points - at least 15 points for the category "relevance of the project".

Following Step 1 of the assessment, proposals meeting the above quality requirements will be ranked in descending order of their total scores. In order to proceed to Step 2, a list of applications per region of two times the estimated number of funded projects (based on the available regional budget11) - will be established.

STEP 2

In Step 2, projects will be assessed against one more criterion:

Feasibility of the project in the targeted region(s)
Y/N​

The proposal is feasible in the local context of the Partner Country(/ies ) targeted by the application. For the assessment of this criterion, the Evaluation Committee is assisted by the EU Delegations in the countries concerned.

 

As a result of Step 2, a number of proposals considered feasible in the targeted regions will be formally recommended for funding, in accordance with the ranking in descendant order within the limits of the available budget per regional envelope and up to a maximum of three project proposals per applicant organisation overall. In addition, attention will be given to ensuring a sufficient geographical representation within a region in terms of number of projects per country.

The acceptance of an application does not constitute an undertaking to award funding equal of the amount requested by the applicant. The funding requested may be reduced on the basis of the financial rules applicable to the action and the results of the evaluation.

 

Priorities

Depending on the countries involved in the project, national, regional or cross cutting priorities may be defined for both categories of projects (Joint Projects and Structural Projects). Should this be the case, projects will have to demonstrate how and to which extent they address these priorities.

Proposals not respecting the national and/or regional priorities will not be considered for funding. Cross-cutting priorities will be considered at selection stage for deciding between proposals of similar quality.

Three categories of national/regional priorities are proposed, covering the following areas:

  • Improving quality of education and training in different subject areas (for curriculum development);
  • Improving management and operation of higher education institutions;
  • Developing the higher education sector within society at large.

National projects, in the countries where national priorities have been established, will have to comply with national priorities. For the other countries, projects will have to comply with the regional priorities.

Multi-country projects, that is, projects involving institutions from at least two eligible Partner Countries, must respect the regional priorities or national priorities (if relevant) of the participating eligible Partner Countries involved. That is, the theme of the project must be listed as regional priority for each of the participating Partner Countries or the theme of the project must be listed as a national priority for each of the participating Partner Countries concerned. Preference will be given to projects focussing on subject areas insufficiently covered by past or existing projects and which include Partner Country higher education institutions not having benefited from or had a limited participation in the programme and/or former generation of programmes.

The detailed list of priorities applying to Capacity-building projects will be published on the websites of the Executive Agency.

 

What else should you know about a Capacity-building Project?

The Capacity Building in higher education action is carried out within the context of the priorities of the “New EU Consensus on Development”12 .

Regional cooperation

Regional (countries within a same region) and cross-regional cooperation (cooperation between different regions of the world) should be relevant and justified by a detailed analysis of common needs and objectives. The choice of the countries must be adequate and coherent with the objectives proposed, in particular in cases where countries from different regions are concerned. Cross-regional cooperation is possible in multi-country projects provided that the theme of the proposal is listed as a regional priority or national priority (if relevant) for all the eligible Partner Countries concerned.

Impact and dissemination

Capacity-building projects are expected to have a long-term structural impact on the systems, organisations/institutions and individuals in the eligible Partner Countries. Projects will have to demonstrate their innovative character, the impact and sustainability of their results and how they intend to maintain or develop the outcomes after the end of the project. Where applicable, projects should demonstrate that they build upon the results of previous EU-funded projects, such as those under the former Alfa, Edulink, Erasmus Mundus and Tempus programmes. Every proposal has to demonstrate how the project results would be disseminated in the relevant target groups. Proposals for Structural Projects which mainly aim to impact at institutional level without demonstrating that the project will have a nation-wide impact, will not be selected.

 

What are the funding rules for (Joint and Structural) Capacity-building Projects?

The financial support to Erasmus+ Capacity-building projects is based on an estimated budget combining contribution to unit costs and real costs.

Capacity-building projects in the field of higher education incur a large variety of costs, including staff costs, travel costs and costs of stay, equipment costs, sub-contracting costs, costs for dissemination of information, publishing, translation, overheads costs, etc.

The word "grant" refers to the amount of financing that may be requested from the programme, representing the European Union financial contribution to the project, and should not be mistaken with the total costs of a project which also includes co-funding from the partner institutions and external stakeholders.

The EU grant to the projects has to be considered as a contribution to cover part of the actual costs incurred by the partner institutions in carrying out the activities foreseen in the application/project. Participation in a Capacity-building project necessarily requires co-funding from the beneficiary institutions. Co-funding has therefore to be estimated by the project partners at the beginning, when the application is being prepared.

The principle of co-funding has been taken into account in the definition of the funding approach and in particular in defining the level of the contribution to unit costs used to calculate the budget/grant of the project. As a result, the applicants and beneficiaries will need to indicate the details of the co-funding made available for information and transparency purposes. Proof of expenditure or supporting documents will not be required.

Although the implementation of the project may require other types of expenditure (such as costs for dissemination, publishing, translation if these are not sub-contracted, overhead costs), this expenditure will not be taken into account to calculate the grant proposed. As a result, they will have to be covered by co-funding.

Financial reporting for budget items based on contribution to unit costs (contribution to staff costs, travel costs and costs of stay) will be based on the principle of the "triggering event". Beneficiaries will have to prove that the activities have actually been and properly implemented and the output produced, but will not have to report on the use of the funds. As a consequence, beneficiaries will have flexibility in the way they manage the funds awarded to cover the expenses necessary for the implementation of the project, once the requirements, in terms of activities and achievements are attained.

Financial reporting for budget items based on real costs (equipment and sub-contracting) will be based on the expenses actually incurred which will need to be duly documented (see below).

The grant proposed will never exceed the grant amount requested and will depend on:

  • the grant amount requested by the applicant, the eligibility of the activities and the cost-efficiency of the project;
  • the total budget available for Capacity-building projects.

The detailed financial implementation modalities of the project must be agreed upon by the partners and formalised in a partnership agreement to be signed at the beginning of the project.

 

What else should you know about this Action?

Exceptional costs for expensive travel

Applicants will be allowed to claim financial support for expensive travel costs under the budget heading "exceptional costs" (up to a maximum of 80% of total eligible costs: see "What are the funding rules?"). This will be allowed provided that applicants can justify that the standard funding rules (based on unit costs per travel distance band) do not cover at least 65% of the travel costs of participants. If awarded, the exceptional costs for expensive travel replace the standard travel grant.

The budget of the project must be drafted according to the following funding rules (in euro):

Minimum EU grant for Joint and Structural projects: 500 000 EUR

Maximum EU grant for Joint and Structural projects: 1 000 000 EUR

Eligible costs

Financing mechanism

Amount/ Maximum ceiling

Rule of allocation

Staff costs

Contribution to the costs of staff performing tasks which are directly necessary to the achievements of the project's objectives  

Contribution to unit costs

B4.1 per manager involved per day of work on the project

Max. 40% of the total grant

Conditional: applicants will have to justify the type and volume of resources needed in relation to the implementation of the proposed activities and outputs. The contribution is provided on condition that the salary for the same tasks is compensated only once.

B4.2 per researcher/ teacher/trainer involved per day of work on the project

B4.3 per technician involved per day of work on the project

B4.4 per administrative staff involved per day of work on the project

Travel costs

Contribution to the travel costs of students and staff involved in the project, from their place of origin to the venue of the activity and return (including visa fee and related obligatory insurance, travel insurance and cancellation costs if justified).

Activities and related travels must be carried out in the countries involved in the project. Any exception to this rule must be authorised by the Agency. For the detailed list of eligible activities, see Annex I of this Guide.

Contribution to unit costs

For travel distances between 10 and 99KM:

20 EUR per participant

Based on the travel distance per participant. Travel distances must be calculated using the distance calculator supported by the European Commission13. The applicant must indicate the distance of a one-way travel to calculate the amount of the EU grant that will support the round trip14.  Financial support will be provided only for travels that are directly related to the achievement of the objectives of the project.

For travel distances between 100 and 499 KM:

180 EUR per participant

For travel distances between 500 and 1999 KM:

 275 EUR per participant

For travel distances between 2000 and 2999 KM:

360 EUR per participant

For travel distances between 3000 and 3999 KM: 530 EUR per participant

For travel distances between 4000 and 7999 KM:

820 EUR per participant

For travel distances of 8000 KM or more:

1500 EUR per participant

Costs of stay

Costs for subsistence, accommodation, local and public transport such as bus and taxi, personal or optional health insurance.

Contribution to unit costs

Staff

up to the 14th day of activity:120 EUR per day per participant

+

between the 15 th and 60 th day of activity: 70 EUR per day per participant

+

between the 61th day of activity and up to 3 months: 50 EUR per day per participant

Based on the duration of the stay (including travel) of the participants.

Students

up to the 14th day of activity:55 EUR per day per participant

+

between the 15 th and 90 th day of activity: 40 EUR per day per participant

Equipment

Contribution for the purchase of equipment necessary for the implementation of the project. Support is provided only for equipment purchased for the benefit of the HEIs in the Partner Countries

Real costs

100% of eligible costs

Max. 30% of the total grant

Conditional: the request for financial support to cover these costs must be motivated in the application form

Sub-contracting

Support for sub-contracting costs that are necessary to the implementation of the project, including, in particular, costs for the compulsory financial audits (audit certificate) and for any external quality assurance procedure.

 

Sub-contracting for project-management-related tasks is not eligible.

Real costs

100% of eligible costs

Max. 10% of the total grant

Sub-contracting to external bodies should be very occasional. The specific competences and particular expertise needed to reach the project objectives should be found in the consortium and should determine its composition.

Exceptional costs Expensive travel costs of participants (for details, see section "what else you should know about this action"). Real costs Expensive travel costs: maximum up to 80% of eligible costs  

 

Table A – Staff costs (amounts in euro per day) Programme Countries

The category of staff to be applied will depend on the work to be performed in the project and not on the basis of the status or title of the individual. In other words, staff costs related, for example, to an administrative task that has been carried out by an academic should be charged under the category "Administrative staff". Actual remuneration modalities of staff involved in the project will be defined jointly by the organisations involved in the project, endorsed by the managers responsible for their employment and will be part of the partnership agreement to be signed among the partners at the beginning of the project.

The unit-cost which will be applicable to calculate the grant will be the one of the country in which the staff member is engaged, independently of where the tasks will be carried out (i.e. a staff member of an organisation of Country A working (partly) in Country B will be considered for the unit-costs under Country A).

 

Manager

Teacher/Trainer/Researcher/

Youth worker

Technician

Administrative staff15

  B4.1 B4.2 B4.3 B4.4

Denmark, Ireland, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Austria, Sweden, Liechtenstein Norway

294

241

190

157

Belgium, Germany, France, Italy, Finland, United Kingdom, Iceland

280

214

162

131

Czech Republic, Greece, Spain, Cyprus, Malta, Portugal, Slovenia

164

137

102

78

Bulgaria, Estonia, Croatia, Latvia, Lithuania, Hungary, Poland, Romania, Serbia, Slovakia, former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Turkey

88

74

55

39


Table B – Staff costs (amounts in euro per day) Partner Countries

The category of staff to be applied will depend on the work to be performed in the project and not on the basis of the status or title of the individual. In other words, staff costs related, for example, to an administrative task that has been carried out by an academic should be charged under the category "Administrative staff". Actual remuneration modalities of staff involved in the project will be defined jointly by the organisations involved in the project, endorsed by the managers responsible for their employment and will be part of the partnership agreement to be signed among the partners at the beginning of the project.

The unit-cost which will be applicable to calculate the grant will be the one of the country in which the staff member is engaged, independently of where the tasks will be carried out (i.e. a staff member of an organisation of Country A working (partly) in Country B will be considered for the unit-costs under Country A).

 

Manager

Teacher/Trainer/Researcher

Technician

Administrative staff16

 

B4.1

B4.2

B4.3

B4.4

Israel

166

132

102

92

Albania, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Barbados, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Brazil, Colombia, Comoros, Cook Islands, Dominica, Gabon, Grenada, Republic of Côte d'Ivoire, Kosovo17, Lebanon, Libya, Mexico, Montenegro, Nigeria, Peru, Saint Kitts And Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent And the Grenadines, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Thailand, Territory of Ukraine as recognised by international law, Venezuela, Zambia, Zimbabwe

108

80

57

45

Afghanistan, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bolivia, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, China, Congo, Costa Rica, Djibouti, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Georgia, Guatemala, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Iran, Iraq, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Micronesia, Morocco, Mozambique, Namibia, Palestine18, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Senegal, South Africa, Surinam, Swaziland, Territory of Russia as recognised by international law, Trinidad and Tobago, Vanuatu

77

57

40

32

Algeria, Armenia, Bangladesh, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Botswana, Myanmar, Burundi, Cambodia, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo – Democratic Republic of the-, Cuba, Korea (DPR), Egypt, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Equatorial Guinea, Fiji Island, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Guyana, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Kiribati, Kyrgyzstan, Laos, Lesotho, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Mauritius, Moldova, Mongolia, Nauru, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Niue, Pakistan, Palau, Philippines, Rwanda, Samoa, Sierra Leone, Solomon, Somalia, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Syria, Tajikistan, Tanzania, Timor-Leste – Democratic Republic of, Togo, Tonga, Tunisia, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, Uzbekistan, Vietnam, Yemen

47

33

22

17

 

  • 1. https://ec.europa.eu/europeaid/new-european-consensus-development-our-world-our-dignity-our-future_en
  • 2. “European Higher Education in the World”, Communication from the Commission to the European Parliament, the Council, the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions, Brussels, 11.07.2013 COM(2013) 499 final
  • 3. REGULATION (EU) No 232/2014 OF THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT AND OF THE COUNCIL of 11 March 2014 establishing a European Neighbourhood Instrument http://eur-lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=OJ:L:2014:077:0027:0043:EN:PDF
  • 4.

    REGULATION (EU) No 233/2014 OF THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT AND OF THE COUNCIL of 11 March 2014 establishing a financing instrument for development cooperation for the period 2014-2020
    http://eur-lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=OJ:L:2014:077:0044:0076:EN:PDF

  • 5.

    REGULATION (EU) No 231/2014 OF THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT AND OF THE COUNCIL of 11 March 2014 establishing an Instrument for Pre-accession Assistance (IPA II)
    http://eur-lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=OJ:L:2014:077:0011:0026:EN:PDF

  • 6.  In the framework of this action, a region is defined as a grouping of countries belonging to a certain macro-geographic area. The classification of regions applied under Erasmus+ is in line with the categorisations made by the different EU external action instruments.
  • 7. The mandate duly signed by the legal representative of the partner organisation will be an annex to the Grant Agreement and has therefore legal force. The template provided by the Agency must be used in all cases without any modification or adjustment. Mandates must be provided using the template  published with the official documents of the call for proposals.
  • 8.

    The following types of organisations are not eligible:

    • EU institutions and other EU bodies including specialised agencies (their exhaustive list is available on the website https://europa.eu/european-union/about-eu/institutions-bodies_en);
    • National Erasmus+ Offices in the eligible Partner Countries (in order to avoid a possible conflict of interests and/or double funding);
    • Organisations managing EU programmes such as national agencies in the Programme Countries should refer to Part C of the present Guide
  • 9. International Standard Classification of Education (ISCED 2011), tertiary education, at least level 5. Post-secondary non-tertiary education ISCED 2013 level 4 is not accepted.
  • 10. In the framework of this action, a region is defined as a grouping of countries belonging to a certain macro-geographic area. The classification of regions applied under Erasmus+ is in line with the categorisations made by the different EU external action instruments.
  • 11. Indicative amounts available per region are published in the following website: https://eacea.ec.europa.eu/erasmus-plus/funding_en
  • 12. https://ec.europa.eu/europeaid/new-european-consensus-development-our-world-our-dignity-our-future_en
  • 13. Distance calculator: http://ec.europa.eu/programmes/erasmus-plus/tools/distance_en.htm
  • 14. For example, if a person from Madrid (Spain) is taking part in an activity taking place in Rome (Italy), the applicant will a) calculate the distance from Madrid to Rome (1365,28 KM); b) select the applicable travel distance band ( i.e. between 500 and 1999 KM) and c) calculate the EU grant that will provide a contribution to the costs of travel of the participant from Madrid to Rome and return (275 EUR).   
  • 15. Students can work for the project and their salaries can be paid from Staff Costs (administrative staff) provided that they have signed a work contract with a consortium member institution.
  • 16. Students can work for the project and their salaries can be paid from Staff Costs (administrative staff) provided that they have signed a work contract with a consortium member institution.
  • 17. This designation is without prejudice to positions on status, and is in line with UNSCR 1244 and the ICJ Opinion on the Kosovo Declaration of Independence.
  • 18. This designation shall not be construed as recognition of a State of Palestine and is without prejudice to the individual positions of the Member States on this issue