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Overview of EU Tourism Policy

EU policy aims to maintain Europe's standing as a leading destination while maximising the industry's contribution to growth and employment and promoting cooperation between EU countries, particularly through the exchange of good practice. The EU's competence in the tourism is one of support and coordination to supplement the actions of member countries. 

 
The EU tourism industry

Guide on EU Funding for the Tourism Sector 2014 – 2020 (version 3, April 2016)

This new version comes with updated hyperlinks, new information on financial instruments (incl. EFSI) and additional examples of recently selected projects.

It focuses on practical questions:

  • Which actions are supported?
  • What kind of funding is available?
  • Who can apply and how?

It also points at projects already funded as a source of inspiration.

Download the guide in Englishpdf Choose translations of the previous link  (1 MB)

Forthcoming languages: FR, DE, ES, IT, PL.

Challenges for the European tourism industry

The main challenges are:

  • security and safety - environmental, political, and social security; safety of food and accommodation; and socio-cultural sustainability threats
  • economic competitiveness - seasonality, regulatory and administrative burdens; tourism related taxation; difficulty of finding and keeping skilled staff
  • technological – keeping up to date with IT developments caused by the globalisation of information and advances in technology (IT tools for booking holidays, social media providing advice on tourism services, etc.)
  • markets and competition - growing demand for customised experiences, new products, growing competition from other EU destinations.

Europe, the world's No. 1 tourist destination – a new political framework for tourism in Europe

In June 2010, the European Commission adopted the Communication, ‘Europe, the world's No. 1 tourist destination – a new political framework for tourism in Europe’. This communication set out a new strategy and action plan for EU tourism.

Four priorities for action were identified:

  1. To stimulate competitiveness in the European tourism sector
  2. To promote the development of sustainable, responsible, and high-quality tourism
  3. To consolidate Europe's image as a collection of sustainable, high-quality destinations
  4. To maximise the potential of EU financial policies for developing tourism.

A regularly updated implementation rolling planpdf Choose translations of the previous link  has been developed that outlines the major initiatives to be implemented as part of the strategy, in collaboration with public authorities, tourism associations and other public/private tourism stakeholders.

To date, the Commission has successfully implemented the majority of the actions set out in the Communication, focusing on the following priorities:

  • increasing tourism demand, from within the EU and beyond
  • improving the range of tourism products and services on offer
  • enhancing tourism quality, sustainability, accessibility, skills, and ICT use
  • enhancing the socio-economic knowledge base of the sector
  • promoting Europe as a unique destination
  • mainstreaming tourism in other EU tourism policies.

Public consultations on tourism policy

In December 2013, the Commission launched two public consultations on the tourism industry.