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Protection of biotechnological inventions

Protection of biotechnological inventions

In 1998, the EU harmonised patent law in member countries relating to biotechnological inventions. This clarifies which inventions are patentable or not on ethical grounds, giving the legal certainty to organisations in the sector that is required to attract the considerable investment that is needed for innovation.

Directive on the legal protection of biotechnological inventions

Directive 98/44/EC, the so-called ‘Biotech Directive’ on the legal protection of biotechnological inventions was adopted in 1998 and implemented by all EU countries.

Expert group on the development and implications of patent law in the field of biotechnology and genetic engineering

The Biotech Directive requires regular reporting on particular issues in the field of biotechnology and genetic engineering. To provide information on recent scientific developments and their implications on patent law, the Commission set up an expert group with the mission to provide expertise, analysis and comments on the rapid evolutions in the biotechnological field.

Final report of the expert group

The report of the expert group provides expert analysis, views and recommendations on three main subjects directly linked to Directive 98/44/EC on the legal protection of biotechnological inventions. The report consists of three chapters dedicated to the patentability of human stem cells, the patentability of patent-related inventions and the scope of protection for DNA-related inventions. The issues surrounding these subjects were identified by experts as deserving of immediate discussion at the beginning of their work. Please note that this report does not necessarily represent the position of the Commission.

Reports

Second report on the development and implications of patent law in the field of biotechnology and genetic engineering (2005)

This report covers developments and implications of patent law in the field of biotechnology and genetic engineering. It focuses on issues in the area of patents relating to gene sequences and the patentability of inventions relating to stem cells. It also reports on the implementation of the Directive.

First report on the development and implications of patent law in the field of biotechnology and genetic engineering (2002)

This report called for the swift implementation of the 1998 Directive on the legal protection of biotechnological inventions to stop Europe falling behind its competitors in this sector, damaging its overall efforts to become the most competitive economy in the world. The report also addresses key provisions of the Directive, such as the potential patenting of plants and animals and the patenting of elements isolated from the human body or otherwise produced, including stem cells.

Assessment of the implications for basic genetic engineering research of failure to publish, or late publication of, papers on subjects which could be patentable as required under Article 16(b) of Directive 98/44/EC

Other documents

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