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  Animal Nutrition - Undesirable Substancesslide
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The aim of EU legislation on undesirable substances in animal nutrition is to ensure that feed materials, feed additives and feedingstuffs are put into circulation only if they are sound, genuine and of merchantable quality and, when correctly used, do not represent any danger to human health, animal health or the environment or do not adversely affect livestock production.

"Undesirable substances" in EU legislation on animal nutrition means any substance or product, with the exception of pathogenic agents, present in and/or on the product intended for animal feed which presents a potential danger to human health, animal health or the environment or do not adversely affect livestock production.

EU legislation on undesirable substances in animal feed from the 1970s on was consolidated by Council Directive 1999/29/EC. This Directive was replaced by Directive 2002/32/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council, 7 May 2002.

Directive 2002/32/EC introduces several major amendments. The most important prohibits the dilution of contaminated feed materials. This Directive includes maximum limits for heavy metals such as arsenic, lead, mercury and cadmium as well as for dioxin, aflatoxin, certain pesticides, and botanical impurities in certain feed materials, feed additives and feedingstuffs.

Commission Directive 2003/57/EC and Commission Directive 2003/100/EC amend Directive 2002/32/EC.

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