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Farming of pigs

European Declaration on alternatives to surgical castration of pigs

Invited by the Commission and the Belgian Presidency, representatives of European farmers, meat industry, retailers, scientists, veterinarians and animal welfare NGOs committed to a plan to voluntarily end surgical castration of pigs in Europe by 1 January 2018. As a first step, from 1 January 2012, surgical castration of pigs will be performed with prolonged analgesia and/or anaesthesia, if carried out. A European partnership will be established to develop the tools to reach the goals and ensure that costs are fairly shared.

Please find here the declaration, the list of signatories and the press release:

Related events:


The Commission ordered a study on the socio-economic implications of different aspects of farming weaners and pigs kept for fattening following the EFSA opinion on the subject.



Farming of ducks and geese

Directive 98/58/EC provides the main principles for the protection of all species of animals kept for farming purposes. It addresses the welfare requirements to be applied for the protection of animals kept for the different types of production, including the production of foie gras

The Directive also provides a legal basis for proposals for Community measures in follow up to Recommendations made under the " European Convention for the protection of animals kept for farming purposes", if necessary for their uniform application within the Community. Recommendations on the farming of ducks and geese, including the production of 'foie gras', have been adopted in the framework of this Convention in June 1999. If it proves to be necessary, the Commission will submit to the Council appropriate proposals for the uniform application of the Recommendations in the European Union.

Response to the Petition on ducks - State aidpdf

Response to the Petition on ducks - Group cagespdf

 
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