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Importation of 'Bees'

"The EU bee population plays an important role in both pollination and the production of honey and other apiculture products within the Community. The EU has therefore laid down specific community rules to protect and maintain the health status of bees within the EU.

In terms of intra-community trade, the general conditions that apply to 'other' live animals also apply to bees. Hence consignment of bees must conform to the general animal health conditions laid down in Council Directive 92/65/EC before they can be traded in the EU . The Directive also lays down a model health certificate for bees which must be completed by the competent authority to signify that the health conditions as laid down in the Directive are met. This certificate must accompany consignments of bees when they enter intra-community trade within the EU.

Similarly in regard to imports, the general conditions that apply to imports of 'other' live animals ' also apply to imports of bees. Hence all consignments of bees must conform to the general animal health conditions laid down in Council Directive 92/65/EC before they can be imported into the EU. In addition, specific animal health conditions and accompanying health certificates for the import of bees are laid down in Commission Decision 2003/881/EC pdf. This Decision was introduced in 2003 in response to the threat posed by two exotic pests of bees, the small hive beetle (Aethina tumida) and the Tropilaelaps mite (Tropilaelaps spp.). These two pests have caused great damage to bee populations in affected third countries, and therefore the imports of bees are restricted in order to prevent the introduction of these pests into the EU. Details of the requirements for imports of bees are contained in the Decision, and are also summarised in the associated press release.


The Community has also responded to the threat posed by the small hive beetle and tropilaelaps mite by ensuring that the presence of these pests is made notifiable in the EU. This means that all beekeepers who suspect their colonies are infested have to inform the appropriate authorities in their Member States. This was done under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1398/2003 pdf, the details of which are summarised in this press release pdf