Fisheries

INSEPARABLE - Eat, Buy and Sell Sustainable FishINSEPARABLE - Eat, Buy and Sell Sustainable FishINSEPARABLE - Eat, Buy and Sell Sustainable FishINSEPARABLE - Eat, Buy and Sell Sustainable Fish

Search
    Free text
Related content
News
The 19th meeting of the IOTC was held in Busan, Korea, from 24 April to 1 May 2015. The IOTC adopted six EU proposals (stand alone or co-sponsored), including improved reporting requirements, a reinsertion of the expired IOTC capacity management framework and a conservation measure on billfish with clear indications of depletion or overfishing (striped marlin, black marlin and blue marlin).
The European Commission welcomes the positive vote of the plenary of European Parliament on the multiannual Baltic Plan, a long-term management plan which establishes targets and conservation reference points for cod, sprat and herring stocks.
Today the European Parliament gave support to a legislative proposal that paves the way for effective and consistent implementation of the landing obligation under the new Common Fisheries Policy. With the vote, the Parliament has endorsed the political agreement reached earlier, in negotiations between the Parliament and the Council on the Commission proposal for a so-called Omnibus Regulation.

Hake (Merluccius merluccius)

Hake © Scandinavian Fishing Year Book
Hake is one of the most important demersal fish stocks in European waters, and is commonly caught in mixed fisheries throughout the North East Atlantic, along with cod, haddock and whiting.

Hake can live for as much as 20 years, and reach a maximum size of 140 cm and 15kg, but their average size is closer to 45 cm. They reach sexual maturity at around three to four years of age. They are usually found in waters between 75 and 400 metres in depth, and tend to live close to the seabed in daytime, leaving it to swim up the water column only at night.

There are two stocks of hake in EU waters which have been identified as separate by scientists. The northern stock is found in the North Sea, Skagerrak, and off the Atlantic coasts of the UK, Ireland and France. The southern stock is located off the Atlantic coasts of Spain and Portugal. Hake is caught with a wide range of gears, both as targeted catch and as by-catch. In the case of the southern stock, it is commonly targeted by vessels also fishing for Norway lobster.

Long-term plans

Hake is managed under two separate plans, one for each stock.