Maritime transport of goods - quarterly data


Data extracted in June 2018

Planned article update: July 2018

Highlights

986 million tonnes of goods were handled in the main EU-28 ports in the 2nd quarter 2017.

Gross weight of seaborne goods handled in EU-28 main ports


This article presents the main results from quarterly statistics on maritime transport of goods in the European Union (EU), plus figures for Norway and Turkey. It covers the gross weight of goods handled in the main European ports, by type of cargo, direction, reporting country and various partner maritime geographical areas. These data are complemented by maritime transport flows with the main extra-EU partners, and with individual results for the major European ports.

The article contains data for the 2nd quarter of 2017. Please note that the quarterly port activity figures are provisional and subject to revisions.


Full article


EU ports activity

Figure 1: Gross weight of seaborne goods handled in main ports, EU-28, 2006Q1-2017Q2
Source: Eurostat, (mar_qg_qm_cwh))

At close to 986 million tonnes, the gross weight of goods handled in the main EU-28 ports increased 2.9 % compared to the previous quarter. Compared with the 2nd quarter of 2016, the gross weight of goods handled in the main EU ports increased 3.3 % in the 2nd quarter of 2017. The rolling four quarter total ending in the 2nd quarter of 2017 showed little change in EU port activity in terms of the gross weight of goods handled compared to the previous four quarters (Figure 1 and Table 1). Regardless of the continued underlying growth trend observed since the 2nd quarter of 2013, the gross weight of goods handled in the main EU ports in the 2nd quarter of 2017 were still lower than the volumes handled before the start of the economic downturn in Europe.

Table 1: Gross weight of seaborne goods handled in main ports, EU-28, 2015Q2-2017Q2
Source: Eurostat, (mar_qg_qm_cwh))

EU ports activity by direction, type of cargo and reporting country

Inwards movements of goods made up close to 60% of the total volume of goods handled in the main EU ports in the 2nd quarter of 2017, about the same as in previous quarters. Compared with the 2nd quarter of 2016, inwards movements of goods to the main EU ports increased 4.6% in the 2nd quarter of 2017, and outwards movements increased 1.3% (Table 2).

Table 2: Gross weight of seaborne goods handled in main ports by direction, EU-28
Source: Eurostat, (mar_qg_qm_ewhd)

Compared to the previous quarter, the 2nd quarter of 2017 saw a decrease of 1.7% in the volumes of dry bulk goods handled in the main EU ports. In contrast, the tonnages of liquid bulk goods (+1.2 %), containerised goods (+7.6 %), gross weight of goods transported on roll on - roll off (Ro-Ro) units (+8.1 %) and other general cargo (+3.2 %) increased in the same period.

Compared with the corresponding quarter of 2016, almost all categories recorded increases, with the largest rises for other general cargo and dry bulk goods; the exception was for Ro-Ro units, where a minor decrease was recorded (Table 3).

Table 3: Gross weight of seaborne goods handled in main ports by type of cargo, EU-28
Source: Eurostat, (mar_qg_qm_ewhk)

The Netherlands, Italy, the United Kingdom and Spain were the largest maritime freight transport countries in Europe in the 2nd quarter of 2017, all handling more than 100 million tonnes of goods in their main ports. Compared with the same quarter of the previous year, all of these four maritime EU member states recorded an increase in main port activity in the 2nd quarter of 2017 (Table 4).

Overall, four of the maritime EU member states reported decreases in the tonnes of goods handled in their main ports compared with the same quarter of the previous year, while eighteen reported growth. In relative terms, the largest decreases were recorded in Romania (-6.3 %) and Germany (-2.7 %). Malta and Greece, on the other hand, both reported increases in main port activity of more than 9.5 % in this period

Table 4: Gross weight of seaborne goods handled in main ports
Source: Eurostat, (mar_qg_qm_cwh)

The main seaborne transport partners

At close to 650 million tonnes, short sea shipping tonnages to and from the main EU ports increased by 2.7 % from the previous quarter. Deep sea shipping tonnages saw increase of 3.2 %, at 305 million tonnes. Between the same periods, international extra-EU transport by sea increased by 2.9%, due to increases in seaborne transport with Africa and America. It should be noted that these figures may be influenced by variations in the level of transport reported with unknown partner geographical zones (Table 5).

Table 5: Gross weight of seaborne goods handled in main ports by various types of partner geographical areas, EU-28
Source: Eurostat, (mar_qg_qm_ewht) and , (mar_qg_qm_ewhg)

In terms of the total gross weight of goods, Russia was the EU’s largest maritime transport partner in the 2nd quarter of 2017, followed by the United States of America (USA), China, Turkey, Brazil and Norway (Table 6). A substantial share of the seaborne transport with Russia is made up of imports of liquid bulk goods to the main EU ports, particularly crude oil and oil products from Russian ports on the Baltic and the Black Sea (Table 7).

Table 6: Top 10 extra EU-28 partner countries in maritime transport by gross weight of goods handled in main ports during the 2nd quarter 2017, EU-28
Source: Eurostat, (mar_qg_qm_ewhp)

Compared with the previous quarter, there were noticeable decreases in inwards movements of coal from the north coast of Columbia as well as in inwards movements of coal from the east coast of the United States of America. Inwards movements of crude oil from Norway also declined. In contrast, the 2nd quarter 2017 saw substantial increases in inwards movements of liquefied gas from Qatar, as well as in inwards movements of other dry bulk goods from Norway. Outwards movements of containers to China decreased; in contrast, outwards movements of containers to the east coast of the United States of America increased in the same period (Table 7).

Table 7: Top 20 extra EU-28 maritime trades flows by gross weight of goods handled in main ports during the 2nd quarter 2017, EU-28
Source: Eurostat, (mar_qg_qm_ewh)

Top European ports

Table 8: Top 5 European ports by gross weight of goods handled during the 2nd quarter 2017
Source: Eurostat, (mar_qg_qm_pwh)

Two of the EU’s top 5 ports saw increases in port freight activity in the 2nd quarter of 2017 compared with the same quarter of the previous year. Europe’s largest port, Rotterdam in the Netherlands, recorded an increase of 4.2 % in the total gross weight of goods handled in this period, while Algeciras in Spain registered a decrease of 2.5 % (Table 8).

Table 9: Top 5 European ports by gross weight of goods handled during the 2nd quarter 2017, for liquid bulk goods
Source: Eurostat, (mar_qg_qm_pwhl)

With the exception of Ro-Ro mobile units, Rotterdam was the largest European port for all other types of cargo in the 2nd quarter of 2017. Compared with the same quarter of the previous year, Rotterdam saw increases in the tonnes of containerised goods (+11.4 %), in the tonnes of dry bulk goods (+7.1 %), in the tonnes of other general cargo (+4.9 %) and in tonnes of liquid bulk goods (+0.1 %). In comparison, Europe’s second largest port, Antwerpen, recorded increases in the tonnes of liquid bulk goods (+2.3 %) and in the tonnes of other general cargo (+1.9 %) between the same periods (Tables 9-13).

Table 10: Top 5 European ports by gross weight of goods handled during the 2nd quarter 2017, for dry bulk goods
Source: Eurostat, (mar_qg_qm_pwhb)

Among other ports, Botas in Turkey saw a decrease in the tonnes of liquid bulk goods (-5.2 %) compared with the 2nd quarter of 2016, and the Turkish port of Iskenderun, Hatay recorded a significant increase in the tonnes of dry bulk goods (+17.8 %). In comparison, Immingham recorded a noticeable decrease in the gross weight of goods transported on Ro-Ro units and also Hamburg in the tonnes of dry bulk goods in this period (-7.9 % and -6.9 %, respectively).

Table 11: Top 5 European ports by gross weight of goods handled during the 2nd quarter 2017, for large containers
Source: Eurostat, (mar_qg_qm_pwhc)

In the container cargo segment, two of the EU’s top 5 ports recorded increases in the tonnes of containerised goods compared with the 2nd quarter of 2016. These two ports saw increases in the number of twenty-foot equivalent units (TEUs) handled in the same period (Tables 11 and 14).

Table 12: Top 5 European ports by gross weight of goods handled during the 2nd quarter 2017, for Ro-Ro mobile units
Source: Eurostat, (mar_qg_qm_pwhr)

Dover in the United Kingdom remained Europe’s largest Ro-Ro port in the 2nd quarter of 2017, despite recording a decrease of 9.8 % in the tonnes of goods handled on Ro-Ro units compared with the same quarter of the previous year. On the other side of the Channel, the port of Calais in France recorded the same amount in terms of the gross weight of goods on Ro-Ro units compared with the same quarter of the previous year. Among the other top Ro-Ro ports, Dublin in Ireland and Zeebrugge in Belgium recorded increases in tonnes of goods handled on Ro-Ro units in this period (+3.6 % and +2.8 %, respectively) ) in Ro-Ro tonnages (Table 12).

Table 13: Top 5 European ports by gross weight of goods handled during the 2nd quarter 2017, for other general cargo
Source: Eurostat, (mar_qg_qm_pwho)
Table 14: Top 5 European ports by volume of containers handled during the 2nd quarter 2017
Source: Eurostat, (mar_qg_qm_pvh)

Data sources and availability

The content of this statistical article is based on data collected within the framework of the EU maritime transport statistics Directive 2009/42/EC on statistical returns in respect of carriage of goods and passengers by sea.

EU-28 aggregates refer to the total of 23 maritime Member States. The Czech Republic, Luxembourg, Hungary, Austria and Slovakia have no maritime ports. However, EU-28 aggregates exceptionally exclude Cyprus as data for reference period 2017 Q1 are not available (see specific remarks below). Norway and Iceland provide Eurostat with data as members of the European Economic Area (EEA). However, quarterly data are currently not available for Iceland. The EEA country Liechtenstein has no maritime ports. Turkey provides data on a voluntary basis as a candidate country.

“Main ports” are ports handling more than 1 million tonnes of goods annually (however, data for some smaller ports may be included in the published results). Data are presented at level of “statistical ports”. A statistical port consists of one or more ports, normally controlled by a single port authority, able to record ship and cargo movements. All tables are based on ports’ total (inward + outward) declarations. The results represent the "handling" of goods in ports.

The “short sea shipping” aggregate (in Table 5) includes partner ports situated in geographical Europe, on the Mediterranean and the Black Sea. “Deep sea shipping” is the complementary geographical aggregate. A more extensive definition of “short sea shipping” is available in the article Maritime transport statistics - short sea shipping of goods.

The concept of maritime transport trade (in Table 7) is defined using the following three variables:

  1. Direction: “inward” transport is distinguished from “outward” transport.
  2. Partner geographical area: usually this corresponds to one country, with the exception of countries of such a size and/or geographical position that the location of individual ports may be quite different and may have a strong impact on the maritime route followed. For example, the ports of the United States of America are grouped in two geographical areas: "East coast" (including Atlantic, Gulf of Mexico, Great Lakes and Puerto Rico) and "West coast" (Pacific).
  3. Type of cargo: the following thirteen cargo types are used in Table 8: liquefied gas, crude oil, oil products, other liquid bulk goods, ores, coal, agricultural products, other dry bulk goods, large containers, Ro-Ro mobile units, forestry products, iron/steel products and other general cargo. The first four types constitute "liquid bulk", the subsequent four types "dry bulk", and the last three types "other general cargo not elsewhere specified", as presented in Tables 3 and 9 to 13.


Abbreviations

: not available
- not applicable
Mio million
Nes Not elsewhere specified
Ro-Ro Roll-on/roll-off
TEU Twenty-foot Equivalent Unit


Quarterly data are in general provisional. Revisions may be made by countries as more complete information becomes available or as a result of quality checks. More specifically, when the complete set of annual data emerges, this usually involves some revision of quarterly data for some countries. This applies particularly to the quarterly estimates of port traffic by type of cargo, which are less robust than the annual totals.

Annual data as presented in this publication are the “rolling” four quarter totals ending in the latest quarter and the corresponding four quarters for earlier years. As a result, the four quarters included do not necessarily come from the same calendar year. For example, the ‘annual’ growth rate in Figure 1 shows the percentage change for the four quarters ending in the 1st quarter of 2017 compared to the four quarters ending in the 1st quarter of 2016.

The basic results (in million tonnes; in thousand TEUs) and the derived indicators (growth rates) shown in the tables are rounded. However, they are all based on non-rounded original data, as available in Eurostat's database.

Specific remarks for this publication for data up to and including the 1st quarter 2017:

  • The quarterly data for port activity in France have been partially estimated by Eurostat for the period 2009 Q1-2016 Q2. These data are to be considered as provisional and are likely to be revised. In general, such estimates reduce the accuracy of the statistics at detailed levels.
  • Starting from 2013 Q1, the quarterly figures for Germany include data for all national ports (both main ports and minor ports).
  • Starting from 2013 Q1, the quarterly figures for Sweden include data for all national ports (both main ports and minor ports).
  • Starting from 2011 Q1, the quarterly figures for Spain include data for a number of regional ports outside the state-controlled port system.
  • The data for Cyprus are not available for 2017 Q1 and thus data for this country are not included in the EU-28 aggregates for the whole period considered in this publication in order to ensure coherence in the time series.


Due to revisions of the underlying data, figures in this article may differ from figures currently or previously available on Eurostat's web site.

Context

The content of this statistical article is based on data collected within the framework of the EU maritime transport statistics Directive 2009/42/EC of 6 May 2009 on statistical returns in respect of carriage of goods and passengers by sea), which is a recast of the original Council Directive 95/64/EC of 8 December 1995.


Direct access to
Other articles
Tables
Database
Dedicated section
Publications
Methodology
Legislation
Visualisations
External links





Maritime transport (mar)
Maritime transport - main annual results (mar_m)
Maritime transport - short sea shipping - main annual results (mar_s)
Maritime transport - passengers (mar_pa)
Maritime transport - goods (mar_go)
Maritime transport - vessel traffic (mar_tf)
Maritime transport - regional statistics (mar_rg)