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Requirements

LIFE project beneficiaries have a number of obligatory and recommended communication requirements.

The following activities are obligatory:

Website:  All LIFE projects are required to have a web presence (either a dedicated website, or part of an existing website). This should provide details of the project’s objectives, actions, progress and results and it should feature the LIFE logo (and Natura 2000 logo for Nature and Biodiversity projects). The website needs to be online within six months of the start of the project and should be updated regularly. The beneficiary is obliged to keep the website online for five years after the project ends.

For models of effective LIFE project websites, visit the resources page or the examples of good communication page.

Layman’s report: Towards the end of the LIFE project, beneficiaries are obliged to produce a short report that presents the project to a general audience. The Layman’s report should include the project’s objectives, actions and results in English and in the local language. It must be published in print and electronic format. The recommended length is 5-10 pages.

For models of effective Layman’s reports, visit the resources page or the examples of good communication page.

After-LIFE Plans: There are different requirements for LIFE+ projects (2007-2013) and LIFE 2014-2020 projects. LIFE+ Environment projects are obliged to produce an After-LIFE Communication Plan that sets out how the beneficiary plans to continue disseminating and communicating results after the end of the project, and indicates what external support could be helpful. LIFE+ Nature projects are obliged to produce an After-LIFE Conservation Plan that sets out how conservation activities are planned to continue and to develop after the end of the project, and how the longer-term management of the site(s) will be assured. It should give details of what actions will be carried out, when, by whom, and using what sources of finance.

LIFE projects funded since 2014 are required to produce an “After-LIFE Plan” as a separate chapter of the final report. It shall be presented in the beneficiary’s language and optionally in English, in paper and electronic format. For best practice projects, the After-LIFE Plan shall set out how the actions initiated in the LIFE project will be continued and developed in the years that follow the end of the project, and how the longer term management of the site(s)/ habitats/ species will be assured. For pilot and demonstration projects, the After-LIFE Plan shall in addition set out how the dissemination and communication of the results will continue after the end of the project. It should give details regarding what actions will be carried out, when, by whom, and using what sources of finance. Visit the examples of good communication page.

For models of effective After-LIFE Plans, visit the resources page or the examples of good communication page.

Noticeboards: Also known as on-site panels or interpretation boards, noticeboards describing the project should be displayed at strategic places accessible to the public. The LIFE logo should always appear on them. For actions taking place in Natura 2000 sites or with the objective of improving the integrity of the Natura 2000 network, the Natura 2000 logo should also appear.

For models of effective Noticeboards: visit the examples of good communication page.

Networking: Projects are obliged to network with other LIFE and/or non-LIFE projects. Networking activities can include visits, meetings, exchange of information, and/or other such activities with an appropriate number of other relevant LIFE projects (ongoing or completed). It may also include similar exchanges with other non-LIFE projects and/or participation in information platforms related to the project objectives (including at international level where justified). Visit the examples of good communication page.

For models of effective Networking, visit the resources page or the examples of good communication page.

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In addition, the following activities are recommended:

Community engagement: through local events, such as public meetings, open days, guided visits and meetings with interest groups. View examples of good communication.

Expert engagement: through workshops, seminars and conferences. These should have a clear output (summary reports, journal articles, etc.) and offer significant networking benefits. View examples of good communication.

The production of publicity material: including project videos, posters, leaflets etc, as well as technical articles in trade and specialist journals. Communication materials must clearly reference LIFE financial support and include the LIFE logo. For audio-visual material, the credits at the beginning or at the end shall include an explicit and readable mention of the LIFE support (e.g. “With the contribution of the LIFE financial instrument of the European Community”). This logo may not be referred to as a certified quality label or eco-label. The use of the LIFE logo shall be restricted to dissemination activities. View Resources or examples.

Public relations: this includes working with the media at the most appropriate level to ensure the best coverage of the project's results; use of social media; and engagement with policymakers at national and EU level to maximise the impact of the project. View Resources or examples.

For full details of projects’ communication requirements, see the Guidelines for applicants (LIFE 2014-2020) or Common Provisions (LIFE+) on the Project Management Tools page.

For advice on all obligatory and recommended project communications actions, click here.

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