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Via Francigena

In 990 AD, during his trip from Rome back to his Episcopal seat, Archbishop Sigeric noted down the 79 submansiones de Roma usque ad mare (from Rome to Canterbury)…

In 990 AD, during his trip from Rome back to his Episcopal seat, Archbishop Sigeric noted down the 79 submansiones de Roma usque ad mare (from Rome to Canterbury). In modern geography, the route crosses seven Italian regions (Lazio, Tuscany, Emilia-Romagna, Liguria, Lombardy, Piedmont and the Aosta Valley), heads across the Alps to the Swiss cantons of Valais and Vaud, then on to France, passes through Franche-Comté, Champagne-Ardenne, Picardy and Nord-Pas-de-Calais, and finally crosses the Channel, reaching Canterbury in the county of Kent. It is a 'route of cultures', as termed by Jacques Le Goff, and has been recognised as a 'cultural itinerary' (1994), and later a 'great cultural itinerary' (2004) by the Council of Europe. The European Association of Vie Francigene (EAVF) added strength to an efficient governance model, which earned it the role of carrier network (2007). This highly respected role reflects the EAVF's leading position as a European reference model for developing and safeguarding the Francigena route.

European Thematic Tourism Routes

Website

http://www.viafrancigena.eu

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