Energy

Updating radiation safety standards in medicine

Updating radiation safety standards in medicine

Monday, 14 September 2015
Updated
Monday, 14 September 2015

International and European basic safety standards (BSS) that protect people from the dangers of radiation in medicine have recently been updated and the EU is now working hard in implementing them.
That was the message emerging from a medical-focussed side event at the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) General Conference held today in Vienna.
Using radiation in medicine is one of the main ways in which people are exposed to radiation. It can diagnose and help treat diseases such as by reducing malignant tumours and cancer growth. However, it can also cause harm if the radiation dose is miscalculated. The use of nuclear techniques in medicine needs to be safe, keeping workers, patients, the public and the environment free from the hazards of radiation exposure.
To prevent such harm, international and European basic safety standards for radiation protection are vital for patients and medical staff. The key challenge facing the sector over the coming years is putting into practice the safety standards, which were recently updated in line with the latest scientific knowledge, technological advances and years of operational experience since the 1990s when the previous BSS were established.
The European Commission and the IAEA are jointly undertaking various awareness activities to ensure the implementation of these safety principles, especially in the health care sector.
IAEA
European basic safety standards

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