IMPORTANT LEGAL NOTICE
 

 ProIntegration - Integration durch interkulturelles Mainstreaming ascii version

Germany

 
DP Managing organisation : Berliner Gesellschaft für internationale Zusammenarbeit mbH
Other national partners : Bezirksamt Berlin-Lichtenberg
Initiative Selbständiger Immigrantinnen e. V.
Seminarzentrum Göttingen GmbH & Co KG
SÖSTRA Institut für Sozialökonomische Strukturanalysen Berlin
Südost Europa Kultur e.V.
Verband für interkulturelle Arbeit e. V.
EQUAL theme :Employability - Combating racism 
Type of DP :Geographical - Urban area 
DP Legal status :Non-profit making organisation 
DP identification :DE-XB4-76051-20-BE/211 
Application phase :Approved for action 2 
Selection date :30-06-2005 
Last update :30-06-2005 
Monitoring:  

Rationale

Text available in

Next to Hamburg, Berlin has Germany’s largest percentage of immigrants, and this percentage continues to rise. According to the Berlin State Statistical Office, Berlin had 441,404 non-German residents in 2003, which is 13.04 % of the total population (1992: 10.7%). However, one must also keep in mind that many immigrants are not included in the usual statistics, either because they as “Aussiedler” (ethnic Germans emigrating primarily from the territory of the former Soviet Union) had German citizenship from the beginning or because they have obtained it in the meantime, following the changes in immigration laws. The statistics do not show, for example, that in the last ten years, Berlin was allocated the largest number of “Aussiedler.” ProIntegration defines its target group more broadly and defines immigrants as people with a migration background, no matter what their citizenship is – as long as this migration background is proving to be of disadvantage to their integration into the job market.



In contrast to the predictions made by social science researchers, which have in general assumed that the integration of immigrants will tend to take place more or less automatically the longer they live in the country to which they have emigrated, the evidence of socially undesirable developments in terms of re-ethnization, anti-integration, and parallel societies has increased in recent years in Berlin. There has been a noticeable increase in the existing tendency to assign immigrants to the underclass. Because of the disadvantaging of immigrants on the labor market, their partial segregation as a result of economic mechanisms on the housing market (the concentration of residents who are socially disadvantaged in disadvantaged areas of Berlin, like Neukölln or northern Marzahn), an ethnization of politics that has been underway since the 1980s, and, at the same time, the self-ethnization with which immigrants responded, immigrants have become a new ethnic underclass also in Berlin. The danger exists that this tendency will become linked to the community building that can be observed, which will then promote the formation of parallel societies. According to a study conducted by the project “New approaches in vocational training for disadvantaged persons” of the JAW Jugendaufbauwerk 2002, problems with the social integration of immigrants are increasing, especially in congested urban areas in Berlin (Marzahn-Hellersdorf and Lichtenberg).



The basic requirement for social integration is, however, vocational integration: gainful employment, with which one can provide for oneself and one’s family, is absolutely crucial to successful integration, although other integration factors (political participation, development of common values, similar basic orientation, and social contacts) also play a major role in enabling people of different origins to live together.



Racism and xenophobia are expressed not only in acts of violence, but also in barriers to entry into the labor market. Evidence of such barriers can be found in the fact that the unemployment rate of immigrants nationwide is always around 50 % higher than that of the German comparison group, no matter what the state of the economy as a whole or the level of unemployment. Immigrants in Berlin who are especially hard hit or threatened by unemployment are those who have not completed any vocational training (74 % of unemployed immigrants), especially those over 45 and under 25, as well as the long-term unemployed (58 % of unemployed immigrants). In 2003, almost 50 % of unemployed foreign nationals in Berlin were Turks, according to employment statistics of the Bundesagentur für Arbeit, the federal employment agency.



It is clearly becoming more difficult for immigrants to meet basic requirements for integration into the job market. Deficient language skills hinder immigrant children at school, young people do not look for promising fields and are more likely to discontinue their initial vocational training, while the percentage of immigrants who have not completed certified training continues to grow. The Berlin Senate has recognized this, stating that: “High school dropout rates and problems with vocational qualification are often caused by insufficient language ability. We want to arrange for language training to accompany vocational qualification. We must step up efforts to give non-German young people the skills they need to undergo and complete vocational training. The effectiveness of and links between institutions and initiatives in Berlin helping to promote the vocational and social advancement of immigrants must be improved.”



Economic transition in Berlin makes this kind of approach necessary for economic reasons as well: following reunification and the discontinuation of special subsidies for Berlin, more jobs have been lost in the manufacturing sector than elsewhere in Berlin, especially those jobs available to unskilled workers. New jobs, if any, are being created in knowledge-based sectors and service enterprises, which require high skills.



Improving the vocational integration of immigrants is thus the top priority of ESF strategy in Berlin not only for social policy reasons, but also for economic reasons. For one thing, we can anticipate a shortage of skilled workers as a result of demographic changes and, for another, many of the immigrants would be able to contribute to Berlin’s development as an international location for business and industry. This is especially true of immigrants who are university graduates and of skilled workers whose certification has not been recognized here.

For Berlin as a link to the east, eastern European immigrants are an important resource because of their cultural and linguistic background and their knowledge of the area. In Berlin, the largest Turkish city outside Turkey, the Turkish community represents great potential for economic and trade relations with the future EU member state of Turkey.



While there are a number of approaches being taken to improve the vocational integration of immigrants, we must acknowledge that the immigrant population is tending more and more to become part of an underclass. We believe that one reason for this is that integration services often do not address the actual needs and situation of the target group, and that this in turn is because the various levels involved in furthering the vocational integration of immigrants in Berlin are not taking an integrated and intercultural approach; rather, they act independently of and parallel to one another. It can also be observed that the continuing education being offered is determined more by the providers’ existing capacity than by the abilities of immigrants or the needs of business and industry. Tendencies of this kind have exacerbated the problems related to the vocational integration of immigrants in Berlin, despite the constant increase of investment in integration measures.



Given the city’s financial difficulties and the implementation of the Hartz IV labor and social policy reforms in the context of the labor market situation in Berlin, the entire training and continuing education sector, as well as the employment offices, face the challenge of achieving more with less money in the future. This, however, requires better tailoring of aid measures – and this in turn requires more precise knowledge of competencies and potential, on the one hand, and, on the other, of what is needed.



Organizations like the administration and the self-governing bodies of business and industry currently do not pay enough attention to how Berlin could benefit from the potential and the opportunities offered by immigrants with work experience and educational qualifications acquired in their countries of origin. Instead, they tend to regard immigrants as an adverse factor and as people who need to be provided for. SMEs, for example, which are central to growth, competitive ability, innovation, and employment in our economy, are thus not systematically exposed to the potential offered by immigrants, since employment agencies often do not focus on this potential themselves. On the other hand, immigrants often lack insight into integration prerequisites and needs; their fear of taking a first step prevents them from getting in touch with organizations that could help them with vocational integration.



In our view, more appropriate services and sustainable improvement of the situation of employable immigrants can be achieved by the use of intercultural mainstreaming, by learning from the experience of all parties involved, and by considering all phases of vocational integration.

dot Top


Objective

Text available in

Berlin is in the midst of a fundamental process of transformation, which is affecting the labor market in particular. “The city was faced with the challenge of fusing two entirely different labor markets, as well as addressing the significant needs for transformation in east Berlin and fundamental structural deficits in west Berlin.” (Berlin’s Labor Market Framework Program [ARP Berlin])



A lot of traditional jobs and training positions – almost half of those in the manufacturing sector alone – disappeared in Berlin in the transition, and these have not yet been replaced. The manufacturing sector in Berlin now employs only half as many people as in comparable areas in West Germany. The labor market is also affected by the proximity to the Polish border, which is perceived less as an opportunity than as low-wage competition contributing to job loss in Berlin.



The city has future growth potential – for example, in the private service sector, in information and communications technology, in personal services and production-related services, in tourism, and in a range of future-oriented technology sectors – and also has increasing needs for skilled workers. But Berlin’s transformation into a service sector metropolis has only begun and has not yet made itself felt in terms of new employment.



Berlin’s unemployment rate is around 17.5%, making it about 7.1% higher than the average in Germany as a whole. This unemployment especially affects immigrants, whose unemployment rate is always around 50% higher than the German comparison group. The transition process described above affects immigrants in two ways. First, they are particularly hard hit by the cutbacks in traditional jobs: in mid-2003, a total of 67,700 immigrants had regular employment (subject to social insurance payments), which was 6.4% of all employees at the time and 5,500 fewer (7.6%) than the year before. The downward trend of recent years, with cutbacks in regular employment in the producing, manufacturing, and construction industries, thus continues.



Second, they are poorly prepared for the changing labor market and the requirements of the new growth industries. These new growth industries in Berlin are mainly knowledge-based and require highly skilled, specialized workers. However, most of the unemployed immigrants are poorly qualified, and only 22.5% have ever completed vocational training. Despite the high unemployment rate, Berlin is confronted with an imminent shortage of skilled workers as a result of demographic change. The city needs efficient strategies for improving integration, not only because of the high percentage of immigrants already here, but because of the need for immigration in the future.



Because migrants are faced with special entry barriers into the labor market, improving their vocational integration is also an express focus of Berlin’s ARP program for labor market policy. ProIntegration is responding to this focus with the innovative strategy of cross-cultural mainstreaming. The labor market policy objective of the DP is to reduce obstacles to the vocational integration of immigrants in Berlin and to make better use of their specific potential for the benefit of Berlin’s economy.



By helping to improve the vocational integration of a target group especially affected by unemployment, the DP is pursuing curative goals with regard to labor market policy. It is also pursuing preventive goals by tapping the specific potential of immigrants for Berlin’s economy. The process of using what has been learned for further development involves all parties having to do with the vocational integration of immigrants and includes all levels of integration. The integrated approach will have a sustainable labor market policy impact if the right participants are brought together and if targeted network-building takes place while the project is running.



At the same time, ProIntegration’s approach puts into practice one of the central concerns of Berlin’s ARP: the more efficient use of existing subsidies and better dovetailing of labor market policy measures to the city’s shifting economic conditions. When the funding available for integration measures continues to decline, then their appropriateness and demand-orientation must be enhanced and synergies between the measures must be used efficiently.



Besides the labor market policy focus “improving vocational integration of immigrants,” ProIntegration also addresses other ARP fields of action:



• Qualification: Since the unemployment rate of unskilled workers is approx. 42%, and since 74% of unemployed immigrants in Berlin have not completed vocational training, their qualification in accordance with demand is of the utmost importance as a means of securing sustainable employability.



However, qualification must be more appropriate than it has been in previous projects – that is, it must be geared to immigrants’ existing competencies and to the needs of the business community in Berlin. Thus, ProIntegration concentrates more on tailor-made modules (project 5 and project 6), which are chosen from a set of options to meet individual needs, than on complex continuing education measures.



• Equal opportunities for women and men: Gender mainstreaming as a consistent principle guiding the ARP Berlin is also a central focus of the DP ProIntegration. Female immigrants in Berlin are less affected by unemployment than male immigrants; around 38% (2002: 38.6%) of all unemployed immigrants are women. According to the statistics of the Federal Employment Agency, 52,488 immigrants were registered as unemployed in 2003; of these, 20,315 were female and 32,173 were male. However, gender gaps remain: girls with a migration background tend to choose jobs traditionally done by women, such as doctor’s assistant, sales clerk, and hairdresser, which pay less and offer fewer opportunities for advancement. Female immigrants are also underrepresented when it comes to starting a business. According to the Center for Studies on Turkey, for instance, just 20% of all businesses started by Turks are founded by women. Highly educated female “Aussiedler” (ethnic Germans emigrating primarily from the territory of the former Soviet Union) are particularly likely to work in jobs below their educational level: mathematicians end up working as cashiers; science teachers, biologists, and chemists find work as laboratory assistants; and construction engineers are employed as sales assistants.



The DP will devote not only a project of its own to implementing equal opportunities, but will take into account in the drafting of all measures the different life circumstances of men and women and will contribute to reducing ethnically conditioned gender gaps.



• Small and medium-sized enterprises, which are defined by the ARP as a driving force for job creation in Berlin’s economy, are a key target group for the DP ProIntegration. Their DP partner projects include measures to secure the existence of SMEs (project 6), assistance with starting businesses (project 5), and the initiation of targeted qualification helping both employees and the unemployed adjust to new demands (projects 4 and 6).



Despite the high unemployment rate, SMEs in Berlin complain that they lack skilled workers; however, because of the difficult economic situation, they invest less and less in training their own personnel. Establishing a closer relationship between qualification and placement and demand will increase the appropriateness of qualification and contribute both to preventing further job loss and to making SMEs more competitive.



The DP focuses especially on developing the innovation potential of SMEs: it systematically utilizes the linguistic ability and cross-cultural knowledge, for instance, of immigrants to benefit Berlin’s economy, encourages the setting-up of networks and groups, works to help highly qualified people start their own business, and uses coaching to help promote necessary adjustments and changes in SMEs with a migration background.



• Local alliances to promote business and employment, which bring local participants in Berlin together and implement action plans, are very important networks for ProIntegration. Involving the boroughs not only creates a foundation for establishing ties to existing programs, but also for establishing the integrated approach.

dot Top


Innovation


Nature of the experimental activities to be implemented Rating
Guidance, counselling ***
Training ***
Training on work place **
Work placement **
Employment aids (+ for self-employment) **
Integrated measures (pathway to integration) *
Employment creation and support ***
Training of teachers, trainers and staff ***
Improvement of employment services, Recruitment structures *
Anticipation of technical changes *
Work organisation, improvement of access to work places *
Awareness raising, information, publicity ***
Studies and analysis of discrimination features *

dot Top


Budget Action 2

2 000 000 – 5 000 000 €

dot Top


Beneficiaries


Assistance to persons 
Unemployed  3.8%  24.4% 
Employed  30.4%  32.9% 
Others (without status, social beneficiaries...)  5.0%  3.5% 
  100.0% 
 
Migrants, ethnic minorities, …  13.5%  36.0% 
Asylum seekers  0.2%  0.2% 
Population not migrant and not asylum seeker  25.5%  24.6% 
  100.0%
 
Physical Impairment  1.6%  1.9% 
Mental Impairment  0.0%  0.0% 
Mental Illness  0.0%  0.0% 
Population not suffering from a disability  37.6%  58.9% 
  100.0% 
 
Substance abusers 0.0%  0.0% 
Homeless  0.0%  0.0% 
(Ex-)prisoners  0.0%  0.0% 
Other discriminated (religion, sexual orientation)  0.0%  0.0% 
Without such specific discriminations  39.1%  60.9% 
  100.0% 
 
< 25 year  3.6%  8.1% 
25 - 50 year  26.4%  40.7% 
> 50 year  9.1%  12.1% 
   100.0% 

Assistance to structures and systems and accompanying measures Rating
Asylum ***
Gender discrimination **
Support to entrepreneurship ***
Disabilities *
Age *
Low qualification **
Racial discrimination ***
Religion or belief *
Unemployment ***

dot Top


Empowerment

 

 With beneficiaries

Participation
Promoting individual empowerment
Developing collective responsibility and capacity for action
Participation in the project design
Participation in running and evaluating activities
Changing attitudes and behavior of key actors

 

 Between national partners

N.C.

dot Top


Transnationality

 

 Linguistic skills

  • English
  • français
  • português

 Percentage of the budget for transnational activities

  • 5.8%

 Transnational Co-operation Partnerships

Transnational Co-operation Agreement DPs involved
3963 DigiTales FI 54
GR 232278
NL 2004/EQG/0001
NL 2004/EQH/0012
SK 61
UKgb 114

dot Top


Background

 

N.C.

dot Top


National Partners


Partner To be contacted for
Berliner Gesellschaft für internationale Zusammenarbeit mbH Co-ordination of experimental activities
Design of the project
DP managing organisation
Evaluation
Monitoring, data collection
Transnational partnership
Bezirksamt Berlin-Lichtenberg
Initiative Selbständiger Immigrantinnen e. V.
Seminarzentrum Göttingen GmbH & Co KG
SÖSTRA Institut für Sozialökonomische Strukturanalysen Berlin
Südost Europa Kultur e.V.
Verband für interkulturelle Arbeit e. V.

dot Top


Agreement Summary

Text available in

Informationen dazu sind direkt beim Koordinator der Entwicklungspartnerschaft erhältlich

Last update: 30-06-2005 dot Top


Berliner Gesellschaft für internationale Zusammenarbeit mbH

(BGZ mbH)
Pohlstraße 67
10785 Berlin
www.bgz-berlin.de

Tel:+49 (0) 308099410
Fax:+49 (0) 3080994120
Email:info@bgz-berlin.de

 
Responsibility in the DP: Co-ordination of experimental activities
Design of the project
DP managing organisation
Evaluation
Monitoring, data collection
Transnational partnership
Type of organisation:Enterprise
Legal status:Non-profit private organisation (including NGO...)
Size:Staff 10-50
NUTS code:
Date of joining / leaving:06-10-2004 /

Contact person(s)

Name First name Phone E-mail Responsibility
Frau Dr. Hansen Hilde +49 (0) 308099410 info@bgz-berlin.de Geschaeftsfuehrerin

Last update: 30-06-2005 dot Top


Bezirksamt Berlin-Lichtenberg

(BA Lichtenberg)
Möllendorfstraße 6
10367 Berlin
www.berlin.de/ba-lichtenberg

Tel:+49 (0) 30902963595
Fax:+49 (0) 30902963309
Email:Maren.Bartz@ba-libg.verwalt-berlin.de

 
Responsibility in the DP:
Type of organisation:Public authority (national, regional, local)
Legal status:Public organisation
Size:>250
NUTS code:
Date of joining / leaving:22-04-2005 /

Contact person(s)

Name First name Phone E-mail Responsibility
Frau Bartz Maren +49 (0) 30902963595 Maren.Bartz@ba-libg.verwalt-berlin.de EU-Beauftragte

Last update: 30-06-2005 dot Top


Initiative Selbständiger Immigrantinnen e. V.

(ISI e.V.)
Seglitzdamm 2
10969 Berlin
www.isi-ev.de

Tel:+49 (0) 306113336
Fax:+49 (0) 306121256
Email:info@isi-ev.de

 
Responsibility in the DP:
Type of organisation:Education / training organisation
Legal status:Non-profit private organisation (including NGO...)
Size:Staff < 10
NUTS code:
Date of joining / leaving:04-10-2004 /

Contact person(s)

Name First name Phone E-mail Responsibility
Frau Ünal Remziye +49 (0) 306113336 info@isi-ev.de Projektleiterin

Last update: 30-06-2005 dot Top


Seminarzentrum Göttingen GmbH & Co KG

(SZG Berlin)
Coswiger Straße 5
12681 Berlin
www.szg-berlin.de

Tel:+49 (0) 30547840
Fax:+49 (0) 3054784299
Email:marzahn@szg.de

 
Responsibility in the DP:
Type of organisation:Education / training organisation
Legal status:Private
Size:Staff 10-50
NUTS code:
Date of joining / leaving:22-04-2005 /

Contact person(s)

Name First name Phone E-mail Responsibility
Herr Komoß Stefan +49 (0) 30547840 stefan.komoss@szg.de Geschaeftsfuehrer

Last update: 30-06-2005 dot Top


SÖSTRA Institut für Sozialökonomische Strukturanalysen Berlin

(SÖSTRA)
Torstraße 178
10115 Berlin
www.soestra.de

Tel:+49 (0) 302807173
Fax:+49 (0) 302807166
Email:soestra@soestra.de

 
Responsibility in the DP:
Type of organisation:University / Research organisation
Legal status:Private
Size:Staff 10-50
NUTS code:
Date of joining / leaving:30-06-2005 /

Contact person(s)

Name First name Phone E-mail Responsibility
Herr Dr. Schiemann Frank +49 (0) 302807173 schiemann@soestra.de Geschaeftsfuehrer

Last update: 30-06-2005 dot Top


Südost Europa Kultur e.V.

(Südost e.V.)
Großbeerenstraße 88
10963 Berlin
www.suedost-ev.de

Tel:+49 (0) 3025377990
Fax:+49 (0) 25298574
Email:sandra@suedost-ev.de

 
Responsibility in the DP:
Type of organisation:Organisation providing support and guidance for disadvantaged groups
Legal status:Non-profit private organisation (including NGO...)
Size:Staff < 10
NUTS code:
Date of joining / leaving:22-04-2005 /

Contact person(s)

Name First name Phone E-mail Responsibility
Frau Niederer Sandra +49 (0) 3025377990 saniebo@yahoo.com Projektkoordinatorin

Last update: 30-06-2005 dot Top


Verband für interkulturelle Arbeit e. V.

(VIA e. V.)
Petersburger Str. 92
10247 Berlin
www.via-in-berlin.de

Tel:+49 (0) 3029007192
Fax:+49 (0) 3029007193
Email:info@via-in-berlin.de

 
Responsibility in the DP:
Type of organisation:Organisation providing support and guidance for disadvantaged groups
Legal status:Non-profit private organisation (including NGO...)
Size:Staff 10-50
NUTS code:
Date of joining / leaving:04-10-2004 /

Contact person(s)

Name First name Phone E-mail Responsibility
Herr Förster Holger +49 (0) 3029007192 info@via-in-berlin.de Geschaeftsfuehrer

Last update: 30-06-2005 dot Top



 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
Warning! This section is not meant to be read directly, but rather be navigated through from the main page above.
 
 
 
 

ProIntegration - Integration of Immigrants through Cross-cultural Mainstreaming

Rationale

Text available in

Berlin ist nach Hamburg die Stadt mit dem höchsten MigrantInnenanteil in Deutschland und dieser Anteil steigt kontinuierlich. Das Statistische Landesamt Berlin weist 441.404 nichtdeutsche Einwohner für 2003 aus, das entspricht einer Quote von 13,04 % an der Gesamtbevölkerung gegenüber einer Quote von 10,7 % im Jahr 1992. Dabei ist allerdings zu berücksichtigen, dass ein großer Teil von Menschen mit Migrationshintergrund von den gängigen Statistiken gar nicht erfasst wird, weil sie entweder als AussiedlerInnen von vorne herein die deutsche Staatsbürgerschaft hatten oder sie im Zuge der zwischenzeitlich eingeführten Neuregelung des Zuwanderungsrechts erworben haben. So wird z. B. von den Statistiken die Tatsache außer acht gelassen, dass Berlin seit 10 Jahren bundesweit den höchsten Anteil an AussiedlerInnen zugewiesen bekommen hat. ProIntegration fasst die Zielgruppe weiter und definiert MigrantInnen unabhängig von der Nationalität/ Staatsangehörigkeit als Menschen mit Migrationshintergrund - sofern dieser Migrationshintergrund sich als Benachteiligung bei der beruflichen Integration erweist.



Entgegen Prognosen sozialwissenschaftlicher Forschung, die die Integration von MigrantInnen mit zunehmender Aufenthaltsdauer im Zuzugsland als sich quasi automatisch einstellenden Prozess betrachtet haben, mehren sich in den letzten Jahren in Berlin die Anzeichen von gesellschaftlichen Fehlentwicklungen, die mit Begriffen wie Reethnisierung, Desintegration und Parallelgesellschaften beschrieben werden müssen. Die vorhandenen Tendenzen zur Unterschichtung verstärken sich spürbar: Die Benachteiligung von MigrantInnen auf dem Arbeitsmarkt, die zum Teil sich vollziehende Segregation durch schichtspezifische ökonomische Mechanismen des Wohnungsmarktes (Konzentration in sozialstrukurschwachen Stadtbezirken wie Neukölln oder Marzahn-Nord) und ein seit Ende der 80er Jahre zu beobachtender Prozess der Ethnisierung der Politik und der gleichzeitigen reflexhaften Selbstethnisierung führen auch in Berlin dazu, dass MigrantInnen eine neue ethnische Unterschicht darstellen. Es besteht die Gefahr, dass sich diese Unterschichtung mit der zu beobachtenden Community-Bildung verknüpft und damit die Bildung von Parallelgesellschaften gefördert wird. So gibt es laut einer Untersuchung des Projekts „Neue Wege in der Berufsausbildung für Benachteiligte“ des JAW Jugendaufbauwerk 2002 besonders in den Ballungsgebieten Berlins (Marzahn-Hellersdorf und Lichtenberg) zunehmende Probleme mit der sozialen Integration von MigrantInnen.

Grundvoraussetzung für gesellschaftliche Integration aber ist die berufliche Integration: Zwar spielen noch andere Integrationsfaktoren (wie politische Teilhabe, die Entwicklung gemeinsamer Werte, Rahmenorientierungen oder soziale Kontakte) eine große Rolle für ein verträgliches Neben- und Miteinander von Menschen unterschiedlicher Herkunft. Einträgliche Erwerbsarbeit, die den eigenen Lebensunterhalt und den der Familie sichert, bleibt jedoch die notwendige Bedingung für eine erfolgreiche Integration.



Rassismus und Fremdenfeindlichkeit äußern sich nicht nur in Gewalt, sondern auch in Zugangsbeschränkungen zum Arbeitsmarkt. Dass es solche Zugangsbeschränkungen zum Arbeitsmarkt für MigrantInnen gibt, belegt bereits die Tatsache, dass bundesweit die Arbeitslosenquote von MigrantInnen– unabhängig von der gesamtwirtschaftlichen Entwicklung und der Entwicklung der Arbeitslosenzahlen - immer rund 50% über der deutschen Vergleichsgruppe liegt. Von Arbeitslosigkeit besonders betroffen oder bedroht sind innerhalb der Berliner Migrantenpopulation: Menschen ohne Berufsabschluß (74% aller erwerbslosen MigrantInnen) und hier insbesondere die über 45-jährigen und Jugendliche unter 25 Jahren sowie Langzeitarbeitslose (58% der gesamten arbeitslosen MigrantInnen). Fast 50% der erwerbslosen AusländerInnen in Berlin sind laut Beschäftigungsstatistik der BA für 2003 TürkInnen.



Beobachten lässt sich außerdem, dass die Ausgangsvoraussetzungen der MigrantInnen für berufliche Integration schlechter werden. Sprachliche Defizite von Migrantenkindern behindern die Schulausbildung, Jugendliche richten sich kaum an zukunftsträchtigen Berufen aus und brechen überdurchschnittlich oft ihre berufliche Erstausbildung ab; insgesamt wächst der Anteil von MigrantInnen ohne abgeschlossene bzw. anerkannte Berufsausbildung. Der Berliner Senat hat dies erkannt und formuliert in der Koalitionsvereinbarung: „Fehlende Schulabschlüsse und berufliche Qualifizierungsprobleme sind oft auf eine unzureichende Sprachkompetenz zurückzuführen. Insbesondere bedarf es der Ausweitung der Anstrengungen, Jugendliche nichtdeutscher Herkunftssprache so zu qualifizieren, dass sie eine Ausbildung absolvieren können. Das in Berlin existierende Angebot an Einrichtungen und Initiativen zur beruflichen und sozialen Förderung von MigrantInnen soll effektiviert und stärker aufeinander bezogen werden.“



Der wirtschaftliche Strukturwandel in Berlin erfordert eine solche Herangehensweise auch aus ökonomischen Gründen: Seit der Wende und dem Wegfall der besonderen Berlin-Förderung sind überproportional Arbeitsplätze im gewerblichen Sektor – insbesondere solche, die eine geringe Qualifikation voraussetzen – weggebrochen. Neue Arbeitsplätze entstehen in Berlin - wenn überhaupt - in wissensbasierten Branchen bzw. in Dienstleistungsunternehmen, die hohe Qualifikationen voraussetzen.



Die Verbesserung der beruflichen Integration von MigrantInnen ist daher nicht nur aus gesellschaftspolitischen Gründen prioritäres Ziel der Berliner ESF-Strategie, sie liegt auch im wirtschaftlichen Interesse des Landes: Zum einen ist aufgrund des demografischen Wandels ein Fachkräftemangel absehbar, zum anderen haben viele MigrantInnen Potenziale, die Berlins Ausrichtung als internationaler Wirtschaftsstandort unterstützen könnten. Dies gilt besonders für akademisch gebildete MigrantInnen oder für Fachkräfte, deren Abschluss formal nicht anerkannt wird. Für Berlin als Drehscheibe Ost stellen die osteuropäischen MigrantInnen mit ihrem kulturellen und sprachlichen Hintergrund und ihren Standortkenntnissen eine wichtige Ressource dar. In der weltweit größten türkischen Stadt außerhalb der Türkei bildet außerdem die türkische Community ein wichtiges Potenzial für Wirtschafts- und Handelsbeziehungen zum künftigen EU-Miglied Türkei.



Es gibt zwar eine Vielzahl von Ansätzen zur Verbesserung der beruflichen Integration von MigrantInnen, es muss aber konstatiert werden, dass sich trotzdem die Tendenz zur Unterschichtung der Migrantenpopulation verstärkt. Unsere These ist, dass die Ursache dafür oft in einer fehlenden Passgenauigkeit der Integrationsangebote liegt und dass die Ursache für die fehlende Passgenauigkeit wiederum darin zu suchen ist, dass die verschiedenen Ebenen, die an der beruflichen Integration von MigrantInnen in Berlin beteiligt sind, keinen integrierten und interkulturellen Ansatz verfolgen, sondern nebeneinander agieren. Es ist auch zu beobachten, dass Weiterbildungsangebote mehr von den vorhandenen und auszulastenden Kapazitäten der AnbieterInnen, als von den Kompetenzen der MigrantInnen und dem Bedarf der Wirtschaft bestimmt werden. Durch solche und ähnliche Tendenzen haben sich trotz stetig steigender Ausgaben für Integrationsmaßnahmen die Probleme bei der beruflichen Integration von MigrantInnen in Berlin verschärft.



Angesichts der Haushaltsnotlage der Stadt und der Umsetzung von Hartz IV im Kontext der Situation auf dem Berliner Arbeitsmarkt stehen der gesamte Bereich der Aus- und Weiterbildung ebenso wie die Institutionen der Arbeitsvermittlung vor der Herausforderung, künftig mit weniger Geld bessere Ergebnisse erzielen zu müssen. Dies aber erfordert eine höhere Passgenauigkeit der Fördermaßnahmen und als Voraussetzung dafür eine genauere Kenntnis der Kompetenzen und Potenziale auf der einen und der Bedarfe auf der anderen Seite. Gegenwärtig konzentrieren sich Organisationen wie die Verwaltung oder die Selbstverwaltungseinrichtungen der Wirtschaft immer noch unzureichend auf Potenziale oder Chancen, die sich aus der Zuwanderung von Menschen mit Berufserfahrung und in den Herkunftsländern erworbenen Berufsabschlüssen für den Standort Berlin ergeben könnten. Sie nehmen MigrantInnen stattdessen meist als defizitär und zu versorgend wahr. So werden z.B. KMUs, die in unserer Wirtschaft zentral sind für Wachstum, Wettbewerbsfähigkeit, Innovation und Beschäftigung mit den Potenzialen von MigrantInnen nicht systematisch zusammengebracht, weil der Blick der ArbeitsvermittlerInnen auf MigrantInnen oftmals nicht deren Potenziale im Fokus hat. Auf der anderen Seite fehlt auch den MigrantInnen oft die Einsicht in Integrationsvoraussetzungen und -notwendigkeiten; Schwellenangst verhindert die Kontaktaufnahme zu Organisationen, die ihre berufliche Integration unterstützen könnten.



Durch interkulturelles Mainstreaming, durch gemeinsames Erfahrungslernen aller beteiligten Ebenen und unter Einbeziehung aller Phasen der beruflichen Integration kann unserer Ansicht nach eine höhere Passgenauigkeit und eine nachhaltigere Verbesserung der Situation von erwerbsfähigen MigrantInnen in Berlin erreicht werden.

dot Top


Objective

Text available in

Berlin ist wie keine andere Region Deutschlands einem tiefgreifenden Umwandlungsprozess unterworfen, dessen Folgen sich vor allem auf dem Arbeitsmarkt manifestieren. „Die Stadt hatte sowohl das Aufeinandertreffen und Zusammenwachsen zweier grundsätzlich verschiedener Arbeitsmärkte zu bewältigen als auch die gravierenden Transformationsnotwendigkeiten im Ostteil sowie die grundlegenden Strukturdefizite im Westteil“ (Arbeitsmarktpolitisches Rahmenprogramm Berlins). Durch den Strukturwandel sind viele traditionelle Arbeits- und Ausbildungsplätze weggebrochen – allein im verarbeitenden Gewerbe nahezu jeder zweite -, die bislang noch nicht durch neue ersetzt werden konnten. Im verarbeitenden Gewerbe arbeiten heute nur noch halb so viele Beschäftigte wie in vergleichbaren westdeutschen Ballungsregionen. Auswirkungen auf den Arbeitsmarkt hat auch die Grenznähe zu Polen, die weniger als Chance denn als Verdrängung durch Niedriglöhne begriffen wird. Zwar sieht die Stadt künftige Wachstumschancen – z.B. im privaten Dienstleistungssektor, in der Informations- und Kommunikationstechnologie, bei personenbezogenen und produktionsnahen Dienstleistungen, im Tourismus und bei einer Reihe zukunftsorientierter Technologiebereiche – und dann auch steigenden Bedarf an Fachkräften, der Wandel Berlins zur Dienstleistungsmetropole ist aber erst eingeleitet und macht sich noch nicht signifikant in Form neuer Arbeitsplätze bemerkbar.



Die Arbeitslosenquote liegt in Berlin derzeit denn auch bei rund 17,5 % und damit 7,1 % über dem Bundesdurchschnitt. Von der Arbeitslosigkeit besonders betroffen sind MigrantInnen, deren Arbeitslosenquote immer 50% über der der deutschen Vergleichsgruppe liegt. Der beschriebene Strukturwandel in Berlin trifft sie in zweifacher Weise: zum einen sind sie vom Abbau traditioneller Arbeitsplätze besonders betroffen. So waren in Berlin Mitte des Jahres 2003 insgesamt 67 700 MigrantInnen sozialversicherungspflichtig beschäftigt, das waren 6,4 Prozent aller Beschäftigten und 5 500 Personen bzw. 7,6 Prozent weniger als noch vor einem Jahr. Zum anderen sind sie schlechter auf den sich wandelnden Arbeitsmarkt und die Anforderungen der neuen Wachstumsbranchen vorbereitet. Diese sind vor allem wissensbasiert, benötigt werden hochqualifizierte Fachkräfte. Von den arbeitslosen MigrantInnen sind aber weitaus die meisten gering qualifiziert, nur 22,5 % haben überhaupt eine abgeschlossene Berufsausbildung. Trotz der hohen Arbeitslosigkeit wird Berlin drohendem Fachkräftemangel durch den demografischen Wandel ausgesetzt und ist nicht nur wegen des bereits hohen Anteils von MigrantInnen, sondern auch wegen des Bedarfs an künftiger Zuwanderung auf funktionierende Strategien zur Verbesserung der Integration angewiesen.



Weil MigrantInnen speziellen Zugangshemmnissen am Arbeitsmarkt ausgesetzt sind, ist die Verbesserung ihrer beruflichen Integration innerhalb des Berliner ARP ausdrücklicher Schwerpunkt. ProIntegration antwortet auf diesen Schwerpunkt mit der innovativen Strategie des Interkulturellen Mainstreamings. Arbeitsmarktpolitisches Ziel der Entwicklungspartnerschaft ist es, Hemmnisse abzubauen, die der beruflichen Integration von MigrantInnen in Berlin entgegenstehen und ihre spezifischen Potenziale zugunsten der Berliner Wirtschaft besser zu nutzen.



Die EP verfolgt arbeitsmarktpolitisch kurative Ziele, indem sie einen Beitrag leistet zur Verbesserung der beruflichen Integration einer Zielgruppe, die von Arbeitslosigkeit besonders betroffen ist. Sie verfolgt auch präventive Ziele, indem sie die besonderen Potenziale von MigrantInnen für die Berliner Wirtschaft erschließt. Der Prozess des lernenden Weiterentwickelns bezieht alle Ebenen ein, die an der beruflichen Integration von MigrantInnen beteiligt sind und erfasst alle Phasen der Integration. Nachhaltige arbeitsmarktpolitische Wirkung des integrierten Handlungsansatzes wird sowohl durch die Zusammensetzung der Akteure als auch durch gezielte Netzwerkbildung während der Projektlaufzeit eingeleitet. Der Ansatz von ProIntegration setzt dabei ein zentrales Anliegen des Berliner ARP um, nämlich den effizienteren Einsatz vorhandener Fördermittel und die bessere Verzahnung der arbeitsmarktpolitischen Maßnahmen mit den sich wandelnden wirtschaftlichen Bedingungen der Stadt. Wenn die Mittel, die für Integrationsmaßnahmen zur Verfügung stehen, immer knapper werden, müssen deren Passgenauigkeit und Bedarfsorientierung erhöht und Synergien zwischen den Maßnahmen besser genutzt werden.



Neben dem arbeitsmarktpolitischen Schwerpunkt „Verbesserung der beruflichen Integration von MigrantInnen“ bezieht ProIntegration weitere Handlungsfelder des ARP ein:



- Qualifizierung

Wenn die Arbeitslosenquote bei Ungelernten ca. 42 % beträgt, in Berlin aber 74% der arbeitslosen MigrantInnen keine abgeschlossene Berufsausbildung haben, ist deren bedarfsgerechte Qualifizierung von zentraler Bedeutung zur Sicherung nachhaltiger Beschäftigungsfähigkeit. Stärker als bisher wird es aber darauf ankommen, die Passgenauigkeit der Qualifizierung zu erhöhen, sie also sowohl auf die vorhandenen Kompetenzen der MigrantInnen als auch auf den Bedarf der Berliner Wirtschaft abzustimmen. ProIntegration setzt deshalb auch weniger auf komplexe Weiterbildungsmaßnahmen denn auf maßgeschneiderte Module (TP 4, 5, 6), die aus einem vorhandenen Baukasten individuell zusammengestellt werden.



-Gleichstellung von Frauen und Männern

Gender Mainstreaming als durchgehendes Gestaltungsprinzip des Berliner ARP ist auch ein zentrales Schwerpunktthema der EP. Zwar sind Migrantinnen in Berlin durchschnittlich weniger von Arbeitslosigkeit betroffen als Männer. Ihr Anteil an der Arbeitslosigkeit aller Migranten liegt bei rund 38%. Im Jahr 2003 waren lt. Statistik der Bundesagentur 52.488 MigrantInnen arbeitslos gemeldet, davon 20.315 Frauen, dennoch lassen sich gender gaps konstatieren: Mädchen mit Migrationshintergrund konzentrieren sich signifikant auf typische Frauenberufe wie Arzthelferin, Verkäuferin, Friseurin, die schlechte Verdienst- und geringe Aufstiegschancen bieten, Migrantinnen sind unterdurchschnittlich repräsentiert im Bereich Existenzgründung. So wird z.B. durch das Institut für Türkeistudien der Anteil türkischer Existenzgründerinnen nur mit 20% an allen Gründungen durch Türken benannt. Besonders die gut ausgebildeten Aussiedlerinnen sind oft unterhalb ihrer Qualifikation beschäftigt, so Mathematikerinnen als Kassiererinnen, Lehrerinnen und Naturwissenschaflerinnen als Helferinnen im Labor, Bauingenieurinnen als Verkaufshilfen. Der Umsetzung von Chancengleichheit widmet die EP nicht nur ein eigenes TP, sie wird durch eine gezielte Strategie gewährleisten, dass ethnisch bedingte gender gaps abgebaut werden.



-Kleine und mittlere Unternehmen,

die das ARP als den beschäftigungsschaffenden Motor der Berliner Wirtschaft definiert, sind eine wichtige Zielgruppe der EP. Ihre TP umfassen Maßnahmen zur Bestandssicherung von KMU (TP 6), Hilfen bei der Existenzgründung (TP 5) und Initiierung gezielter Anpassungsqualifizierungen für Beschäftigte und Arbeitslose (TP 4). Trotz der hohen Arbeitslosigkeit klagen die KMU in Berlin über Fachkräftemangel; aufgrund der schlechten wirtschaftlichen Lage investieren sie selbst aber immer weniger in die betriebliche Weiterbildung. Durch eine engere Verbindung von Qualifizierung mit Vermittlung und Bedarfsorientierung wird die Passgenauigkeit erhöht und ein Beitrag sowohl zur Sicherung vorhandener Arbeitsplätze als auch zur Steigerung der Wettbewerbsfähigkeit von KMU geleistet. Einen besonderen Schwerpunkt legt die EP auf die Erschließung von Innovationspotenzialen für KMU: Sie macht u.a. Sprachkenntnisse und interkulturelles Erfahrungswissen von MigrantInnen systematisch für die Berliner Wirtschaft nutzbar, fördert die Entstehung von Netzwerken und Verbünden, versucht gezielt die Existenzgründung Hochqualifizierter zu initiieren und fördert durch Coaching erforderliche Anpassungen und Veränderungen in KMU mit Migrationshintergrund.



- Bezirkliche Bündnisse für Wirtschaft und Arbeit,

die in Berlin die lokalen Akteure zusammenführen und die Aktionspläne umsetzen, sind für ProIntegration besonders wichtige Netzwerke. Durch die Einbeziehung der Bezirke wird nicht nur eine Basis gelegt für die Verbindung mit bereits bestehenden Konzepten, sondern auch für die Verankerung des integrierten Handlungsansatzes.

dot Top



Logo EQUAL

Home page
DP Search
TCA Search
Help
Set Language Order
Statistics