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Eurobarometer: A majority in four newer EU Member States want the euro

08.05.2015 - The latest Eurobarometer survey carried out in seven non-euro area countries shows that a majority of citizens in four of them are in favour of introducing the common currency. In all seven countries, most think they will personally manage to adapt to the euro as their new currency.

The survey was carried out in seven EU Member States that have yet to join the euro – Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Croatia, Hungary, Poland, Romania, and for the first time, Sweden. As in the past, the survey excluded Denmark and the UK, which have opted out of the common currency.

In four countries, a majority of citizens favours introducing the euro, while in three countries, a majority is against

The survey reveals that support for the euro varies greatly among the seven individual countries. While a majority of citizens in Romania (68%), Hungary (60%), Bulgaria (55%) and Croatia (53%) is in favour of introducing the euro, a majority of citizens in the other three countries surveyed is against: Czech Republic (70% against), Sweden (66%) and Poland (53%).

The overall result stabilises last year's positive overall trend reversal albeit at a lower level. Now a narrow relative majority of 49% across the seven non-euro area countries supports the introduction of the euro, while 48% are against. In 2014, support stood at 52% while in 2013 support was 45%.

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A majority sees positive impact in the countries already using the euro but expects negative consequences from introducing the euro in their own country

Asked how they saw the impact of the introduction of the euro in the current euro area countries, 51% of respondents said they thought the effects were positive. By contrast, an overall majority of 53% of respondents said that they thought adopting the euro would have negative consequences for their own country, while 41% expected positive consequences.

Views on the benefits of the euro again vary significantly in the individual countries. 54% of respondents in Romania said they expected positive consequence for their country, compared to 50% in Hungary, 40% in Bulgaria, 39% in Poland, 38% in Sweden and just 26% in the Czech Republic.

Asked for the first time whether they thought they would personally manage to adapt to the euro as their new currency, a strong overall majority of 81% said they would. This feeling was supported by majorities in all seven countries, ranging from 71% in the Czech Republic to 89% in Romania. 

On the other hand, when asked for the first time whether they thought their countries were ready to adopt the euro, 79% said that they did not think their country was ready. This feeling was supported by majorities in all seven countries, ranging from 69% in Romania, to 76% in Sweden, to 86% in Poland.   

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To ensure a successful changeover, citizens think displaying prices in the old currency and euros at the same time is most essential

Citizens confirmed that they thought displaying prices in both the old currency and euros was the most important action to ensure a successful changeover. An overall majority of 70% said that they thought this should be done in shops, while 66% said that it should also be printed on bills and 64% on their pay slips.

Television was ranked as the most preferred channel of information by 70%, followed by the internet (58%). 64% of respondents said that information via the internet was important for information campaigns, compared to 59% for TV advertisements, 54% for newspapers and 51% for radio.

The respondents' interests were evenly distributed across all practical aspects of introducing the euro, including the value of one euro (75%), social, economic or political implications, as well as practical implications for their own salary and bank account (75%).

Background

Citizens replied to a set of questions ranging from awareness and knowledge of euro banknotes and coins, the possible date of euro introduction in their own country, their readiness and expected consequences, as well as about their desire for information about the euro and the changeover process.

Some 7 000 respondents across the seven EU Member States that have yet to join the euro  – Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Croatia, Hungary, Poland, Romania and Sweden - were interviewed by phone from 20 to 22 April 2015.

Documents

Flash Eurobarometer 418pdf(6 MB) Choose translations of the previous link 

Flash Eurobarometer 418. Summarypdf(2 MB) Choose translations of the previous link 

Opinion polls

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