Digital Agenda for Europe
A Europe 2020 Initiative

Luxembourg

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Spider chart showing Luxembourg's score in connectivity, human capital, digital public services, use of internet and integration of digital technology compared to the EU average score
Find here the most recent analysis and data by country. A selection of key documents and graphs are shown about topics such as broadband, internet activity and skills, egovernment, ICT in schools, research and innovation, as well as other main indicators.
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Luxembourg has an overall score[1] of 0.53 and ranks 8th out of the 28 EU Member States. Relative to last year, Luxembourg has improved or maintained its good scores in most of the dimensions. Luxembourg is 2nd among EU countries on Connectivity, (although there was no progress in harmonisation of spectrum, where Luxembourg is an underperformer) and 6th on Human Capital (93% of citizens are internet users and 82% have basic digital skills; however, 58.5% of businesses looking for ICT specialists reported problems in finding them.) The Use of Internet continued to grow. On the Integration of Digital Technology the country dropped six positions in ranking (sharpest fall in SMEs selling online: 7% in 2014 against 15% in 2013). Moreover, progress is also expected in the field of Digital Public Services (Luxembourg should get better in eGovernement, eHealth and in the availability of open data).

Luxembourg is among medium‑performance[2] countries.

DESILuxemburgClusterEU
rankscorescorescore
DESI 201580.530.510.47
DESI 201470.50.470.44

1. Connectivity

1 ConnectivityLuxemburgClusterEU
rankscorescorescore
DESI 201520.710.60.55
DESI 201480.60.540.51

 

Connectivity along with use of Internet are the DESI 2015 dimensions where Luxembourg performs best. With an overall Connectivity score of 0.71, the country ranks 2nd among EU countries. However, there was no progress in harmonisation of spectrum, a category where Luxembourg is an underperformer.

 

 LuxemburgEU
DESI 2015DESI 2014DESI 2015
valuerankvaluerankvalue
1a1 Fixed BB Coverage
% households
100%
(2013)
 3100%
(2013)
397%
(2013)
1a2 Fixed BB Take-up
% households
91%
(2014)
 169%
(2013)
970%
(2014)
1b1 Mobile BB Take-up
Subscribers per 100 people
79
(2014)
 681
(2013)
667
(2014)
1b2 Spectrum
% of the target for spectrum to be harmonised at EU level
56%
(2014)
 2456%
(2013)
2170%
(2014)
1c1 NGA Coverage
% households, out of all households
94%
(2013)
 594%
(2013)
562%
(2013)
1c2 Subscriptions to Fast BB
% of subscriptions >= 30Mbps, out of fixed BB subscriptions
34%
(2014)
 1222%
(2013)
1322%
(2014)
1d1 Fixed BB Price
% individual gross income spent for the cheapest standalone Fixed Broadband subscription (lower values are better)
1.2%
(2014)
 91.1%
(2013)
71.3%
(2014)

 

Luxemburg has completed broadband coverage and 94% of these connections are fast (at least 30 Mbps). Take up is strong, also for the faster connections.

Luxembourg however needs to improve harmonising the relevant bands of spectrum for broadband.

 

2. Human Capital

2 Human CapitalLuxemburgClusterEU
rankscorescorescore
DESI 201560.650.570.54
DESI 201460.640.540.52

 

With a Human Capital score of 0.65, Luxembourg maintained its 6th place among EU countries with a slightly better performance than in the previous year (0.64). The same holds true for all sub-dimensions including the share of internet users in the population and the share of those having basic digital skills which are the highest in the whole EU.

 

 LuxemburgEU
DESI 2015DESI 2014DESI 2015
valuerankvaluerankvalue
2a1 Internet Users
% individuals (aged 16-74)
93%
(2014)
 193%
(2013)
175%
(2014)
2a2 Basic Digital Skills
% individuals (aged 16-74)
82%
(2014)
 180%
(2012)
159%
(2014)
2b1 ICT Specialists
% employed individuals
4%
(2013)
 54%
(2012)
52.8%
(2013)
2b2 STEM Graduates
Graduates in STEM per 1000 individuals (aged 20 to 29)
2.8
(2012)
 282.8
(2012)
2817
(2012)

 

The transmission of technology into new ideas and products also hinges on the availability of a vast pool of aptly skilled workers. Despite widespread basic digital skills, there is a shortage of qualified ICT experts in Luxembourg: In 2014, 58.5% of enterprises which recruited or tried to recruit staff for jobs requiring ICT specialist skills reported problems in filling these positions, up from 52.8% in 2012[3]. This is the second-highest figure in the EU. This problem is also related to Luxembourg’s low number in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) graduates. Luxembourg is one of the worst performers in STEM graduates with a mere 2.8 graduates in STEM per 1000 individuals compared to an average of 17 graduates per 1000 individuals for the EU (2012 figures).

3. Use of Internet

3 Use of InternetLuxemburgClusterEU
rankscorescorescore
DESI 201550.510.440.41
DESI 201470.490.420.39

 

In terms of the propensity of individuals to use Internet services, Luxembourg scores 0.51 (up from 0.49 last year) and ranks 5th among EU countries. The use of internet continued to grow in the most of followed categories with an exception of video calls, which has dropped.

 

 LuxemburgEU
DESI 2015DESI 2014DESI 2015
valuerankvaluerankvalue
3a1 News
% individuals who used Internet in the last 3 months (aged 16-74)
85%
(2014)
 782%
(2013)
1067%
(2014)
3a2 Music, Videos and Games
% individuals who used Internet in the last 3 months (aged 16-74)
59%
(2014)
 453%
(2012)
1149%
(2014)
3a3 Video on Demand
% households that have a TV
27%
(2013)
 1427%
(2013)
1439%
(2013)
3a4 IPTV
% households that have a TV
16%
(2013)
 1216%
(2013)
1213%
(2013)
3b1 Video Calls
% individuals who used Internet in the last 3 months (aged 16-74)
42%
(2014)
 1446%
(2013)
837%
(2014)
3b2 Social Networks
% individuals who used Internet in the last 3 months (aged 16-74)
64%
(2014)
 1460%
(2013)
1558%
(2014)
3c1 Banking
% individuals who used Internet in the last 3 months (aged 16-74)
70%
(2014)
 967%
(2013)
1057%
(2014)
3c2 Shopping
% individuals who used Internet in the last year (aged 16-74)
78%
(2014)
 574%
(2013)
563%
(2014)

 

Internet users in Luxemburg are skilled and do not hesitate to engage in a broad range of online activities. They read news online (85%), listen to music, watch films and play games online (59%), use the Internet to communicate via video calls (42%) or through social networks (64%), and obtain video content using their broadband connections (mostly though Video on Demand – 27%). For most of these activities, engagement among users in Luxembourg is in line or higher than the EU average.

4. Integration of Digital Technology

4 Integration of Digital TechnologyLuxemburgClusterEU
rankscorescorescore
DESI 2015150.330.370.33
DESI 201490.370.340.3

 

In the dimension "Integration of Digital Technology" by businesses, Luxembourg scores only 0.33, its second worst score among the five DESI 2015 dimensions and drops six positions in the rank compared to last year.

 

 LuxemburgEU
DESI 2015DESI 2014DESI 2015
valuerankvaluerankvalue
4a1 Electronic Information Sharing
% enterprises (no financial sector, 10+ employees)
39%
(2014)
 936%
(2013)
631%
(2014)
4a2 RFID
% enterprises (no financial sector, 10+ employees)
4.9%
(2014)
 102.3%
(2011)
103.8%
(2014)
4a3 Social Media
% enterprises (no financial sector, 10+ employees)
15%
(2014)
 1615%
(2013)
1614%
(2014)
4a4 eInvoices
% enterprises (no financial sector, 10+ employees)
6.6%
(2014)
 257.4%
(2013)
2211%
(2014)
4a5 Cloud
% enterprises (no financial sector, 10+ employees)
6.9%
(2014)
 19n.a.-11%
(2014)
4b1 SMEs Selling Online
% SMEs (no financial sector, 10+ employees)
7%
(2014)
 2515%
(2013)
1015%
(2014)
4b2 eCommerce Turnover
% turnover of SMEs (no financial sector, 10-249 employees)
2.9%
(2014)
 26n.a.-8.8%
(2014)
4b3 Selling Online Cross-border
% SMEs (no financial sector, 10+ employees)
15%
(2013)
 115%
(2013)
16.5%
(2013)

 

A true digital economy is one where businesses take full advantage of the possibilities and benefits offered by digital technologies, to improve their efficiency and productivity, and reach out to customers to sell goods and services. In this respect, the adoption of e-Business practices by companies in Luxemburg shows a contrasted picture.

Luxembourg’s businesses exploit well Electronic Information Sharing and RFID technology. On the other hand, the use of eInvoices dropped from last year and the share of eCommerce in SME’s turnover remain as low as before. On the other hand, SMEs from Luxembourg appear to take advantage of the internet to access non-domestic markets and sell cross-border. This is partly due to the size of the country and the openness of its economy.

5. Digital Public Services

5 Digital Public ServicesLuxemburgClusterEU
rankscorescorescore
DESI 2015230.330.490.47
DESI 2014240.30.450.45

 

In the dimension of Digital Public Services Luxembourg scores 0.33 and thus ranks only 23rd among EU countries. Although the country achieved either growth or at least stagnation in all monitored categories, it was not enough to catch up with the countries in its cluster. Therefore, improvements in the areas of eGovernement and eHealth remain to be key challenges for Luxembourg.

 

 LuxemburgEU
DESI 2015DESI 2014DESI 2015
valuerankvaluerankvalue
5a1 eGovernment Users
% individuals returning filled forms, out of Internet users in the last year (aged 16-74)
37%
(2014)
 1427%
(2013)
1533%
(2014)
5a2 Pre-filled Forms
Score (0 to 100)
12
(2014)
 2412
(2013)
2545
(2014)
5a3 Online Service Completion
Score (0 to 100)
72
(2014)
 2064
(2013)
2075
(2014)
5a4 Open Data
Score (0 to 700)
240
(2014)
 26n.a.-380
(2014)
5b1 Medical Data Exchange
% General Practitioners
18%
(2013)
 1818%
(2013)
1836%
(2013)
5b2 ePrescription
% General Practitioners
11%
(2013)
 1411%
(2013)
1427%
(2013)

 

Modern public services offered online in an efficient manner are a vehicle for reducing public spending as well as for driving efficiency gains for enterprises, citizens, and the public administration. Luxembourg has considerable potential to improve its offer of online public services, as internet users do engage and exchange documents online with the public administration.

Luxembourg could do more notably to improve the availability of open data: By making data available, government agencies can enable the private sector to leverage those data and create economic value.

 

[1] DESI scores range from 0 to 1, the higher the score the better the country performance.

[2] In the DESI 2015, the medium-performance cluster of countries comprises Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Estonia, France, Germany, Ireland, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Portugal, Spain  and the United Kingdom

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Last updated on 27/04/2015