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Can open science enhance technology transfer?

Open Science is often mentioned as a key trend for increasing the quality and productivity of science. ICT dramatically enhances the possibility to share scientific data, workflows, models, which increases the rate of discovery and enable faster detection of mistakes. 

As Neelie Kroes said "our society and our future are best served through science that is faster, better and more open" http://commentneelie.eu/speech.php?sp=SPEECH/13/236

For instance, the Synaptic Leap initiative aimed to find an alternative drug treatment for schistosomiasis with fewer side effect. All data and experiments were published on Electronic Lab Notebook; social network were activated. About 30 people, half from industry, participated. This led to the rapid identification of new process and resolving agent.

For more discussion, you can also follow todays webinar on #open science in the Futurium platform at 1pm CET: https://ec.europa.eu/digital-agenda/futurium/en/content/future-open-science

Can we adopt this approach across standard research projects? What are the barriers and the advantages? What are the best practices you can point at?

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nmorsofi's picture

One of the bases of science development was the knowledge sharing of the scientific community along centuries. Every step in science stayed on the open previous work of other scientific. But during the last years science became patented and the general scientific knowledge is threatened of starvation.
Looking for new and powerful ways of sharing knowledge, data and approaches sounds to me as a promising way to speed up science and technology

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nbezocar's picture

Sofía, you are right. Your comment is very accurate, knowledge became a property, but nowadays communities of scientists surge again using collaborative tools that accelerate research by years

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nszkutka's picture

European Commission already in the FP7 programme run the Open Access pilot (open access to scientific articles stemming from EU-funded research).

Studies have shown that the major impact of open access stems from enabling a wide spectrum of readers to have a possibility to search through state-of-the-art science information. It thus shortens the time to market for many innovations. 

The JISC report  estimated that OA may be worth of £170 million per year to the UK economy thanks to wider access to academic research.

And open access is only a small fraction of open science importance. Horizon 2020 will test the Open Data policy. Some experiments on open innovation and inducement prizes were already introduced in FP7 programme and will be continued in the next programme. 
 
Definitely open access, open scientific data & open innovation initiatives are all very important for faster technological transfer and innovation. 
 
 
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nkivimai's picture

Living Labs and open innovation methods provides great possibilities to gather and test knowledge in open environment. E.g. SMEs can test their opinions from their target group in various test beds in around Europe and Living Labs. In these environments student/SME etc. are able to make user studies, direct the conversation in the web forum and collect feedback. This way you can get user opinions fast and easy to be implemented in services, products and ideas. Open example of cooperation is between university, city of Oulu and business collaboration comes from PATIO, which provides exactly those top users who have the best ideas – also to those tests made in real environments. It is the world's first Citizens Living Lab developed by a city. http://www.patiolla.fi/en/info

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