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The Kimberley Process, the fight against ‘conflict diamonds’

The European Union is a major centre for diamond trading, with cities such as Antwerp and London attracting buyers and sellers from across the globe. Within the EU, a Regulation sets out the criteria for importing or exporting rough diamonds in order to ensure adherence to the requirements of the ‘Kimberley Process’ (KP).

What is the Kimberley Process?

Southern African diamond-producing states met in Kimberley, South Africa, in May 2000 to discuss ways to stop the trade in ‘conflict diamonds’ and to ensure that this trade was not fuelling violence by rebel movements.

In December 2000, the United Nations General Assembly adopted a landmark Resolution supporting the creation of the Kimberley Process Certification Scheme (KPCS), which came into existence in 2003.

The KPCS currently has 54 members representing 80 countries (with the EU as a single participant).

The FPI’s role

  • Through the FPI, the European Commission represents the EU in the Kimberley Process, and is advised by the EU KP Committee. The Commission also coordinates and monitors the implementation of KP rules within the EU.
  • The FPI holds the Chair of the KP Working Group on Monitoring (WGM), overseeing compliance with KPCS requirements.
  • The FPI also contributes more generally to policy making on other conflict natural resources.

Facts & figures

The 54 participants in the Kimberley Process

Some participants at the April 2012 meeting of the Ad Hoc Committee on Kimberley Process Review
Some participants at the April 2012 meeting of the Ad Hoc Committee on Kimberley Process Review