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IfS support to Palestine refugees

The Instrument for Stability collaborates with the United Nations Relief and Works Agency (UNRWA) to support Palestine refugees retaining their livelihoods in the midst of the Syrian crisis.

The conflict in Syria has affected the weak and vulnerable disproportionately, among them women, children and also many Palestine refugees. Prior to the conflict Syria offered a relatively hospitable environment to the almost 519,000 registered Palestine refugees, most of whom lived in the greater Damascus area. Their situation has deteriorated significantly and rapidly.

Aware of their precarious status, most Palestine refugees have avoided positioning themselves in the conflict, but this has not protected them from becoming caught up between the warring parties. Fighting has been taking place in the vicinity of camps and has also entered them - especially in Yarmouk camp in Damascus city. By November 2013, more than half of the Palestine refugees in Syria have been displaced inside Syria or fled to the neighbouring countries and 80% are in need of assistance (UN figures).

The Instrument for Stability collaborates with UNRWA to provide critical assistance, helping ordinary Palestine refugees and Syrians retain their livelihoods, and continue their education. Increased safety and security measures allow UNRWA staff (mainly Palestine refugees) to remain operational despite the on-going conflict. Those who need to flee Syria, mainly to Lebanon, are helped with accommodation. More about the EU support

Alternative learning modules are developed through this project: 400 lessons based on the Syrian curriculum in the topics of Maths, Arabic, English and Science are being produced and broadcast via satellite TV so that Palestine refugee and Syrian children can follow lessons even when the on-going conflict prevents them from physically going to school.

Photos & Videos

Emergency Education for Palestinian Refugees from Syria.

A typical lesson that the children can follow in their own language