IMPORTANT LEGAL NOTICE - The information on this site is subject to adisclaimerand acopyright notice
 
Contact | Search on EUROPA  


 

Security in Transport & Energy


Overview

Public consultations

Studies & reports

 

Transport

Aviation

Maritime

Land - Passengers

Land - Freight

Dangerous goods

 

Energy

Overview

 

Critical infrastructure

Overview

 

Information

International Cooperation and Coordination

 

Research

 

Video
Protecting passengers and goods transport in Europe

September 2006

 

Leaflet
Protecting Europe
Ensuring the security of energy and transport services across the European Union

   

Public consultations

In the domain of Security in Transport and Energy there are presently no Public Consultations running.

Past consultations:

|Revision of Community legislation on the Inland transport of dangerous goods (July 2006)

|Rail and urban passenger transport security (April 2006)

|Freight Transport Security (December 2003)

 

Revision of Community legislation on the Inland transport of dangerous goods

The European Commission has included in its Work Programme 2006 a proposal in the area of the transport of dangerous goods. It is recalled that at present the European rules on dangerous goods transport cover road and rail transport modes; the rules can be found in four pieces of Community legislation, namely Directives 94/55/EC (road), 96/49/EC (rail), 96/35/EC and 2000/18/EC (safety advisers) respectively. Substantial elements of the road and rail directives are international rules (so called ADR and RID), which are based on a model developed by the United Nations: “Recommendations on the Transport of Dangerous Goods; Model regulations”, last amended in 2005. The UN model aims at creating, whenever possible, identical rules for all transport modes.

Road and rail directives have been amended a number of times so as to ensure that they remain in line with international rules. Inevitably developments over time have rendered a number of clauses redundant (like directives on safety advisers) or obsolete. The Commission’s intention is to propose to take such clauses off the Community legislation.

Another intention is to propose to merge the current rules on dangerous goods transport by road and rail into one piece of Community legislation. The Commission believes that this would avoid duplication, make application of the rules by operators easier and allow the public to gain of clearer picture of existing rules.

The third element of the Commission’s initiative is intended to be an extension of Community legislation to include the international rules on dangerous goods transport by inland waterways (so called ADN), which are also based on the UN model. The Commission believes that such extension would be a logical supplement to Community legislation, in order to create a set of uniformly applied rules for all inland transport modes in the territory of the European Union.

REPORT OF THE PUBLIC CONSULTATION ON THE REVISION OF COMMUNITY LEGISLATION ON THE INLAND TRANSPORT OF DANGEROUS GOODS

 

last update: 11-02-2009