Neelie KROES
Vice-President of the European Commission

Navigation path

Time to get serious about cyber-crime

What if a European country suddenly lost access to email, online media, government websites and home banking?  This isn’t the plot from a Hollywood film, but was the reality for the population of Estonia when their country was hit by a wave of cyber-attacks back in 2007. I’ve just been in Budapest, where I was a guest of the Hungarian Presidency of the EU at the Ministerial Conference on Critical Information Infrastructure Protection.  While I’m regularly involved in discussions on cyber-security, with the European Commission itself coming under cyber-attack only a few weeks ago, I couldn’t help but think our talks had an added significance this time. In a globally interconnected world where our reliance on networks and information systems to provide crucial services grows day-by-day, the disruptive effects of cyber-crime are potentially huge.  An act of cyber-crime in one place could be quickly felt thousands of miles away. We therefore need global action and that’s why I, alongside EU Home Affairs Commissioner Cecilia Malmstrom, was delighted to meet with US Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano during the Budapest conference, where we reiterated our commitment to deepening co-operation against the increasing threats to global internet and digital networks. This level of co-operation with one of our most important international partners is welcome, but if we’re truly serious about tackling the growing global threat to our cyber-security, then we also need to look closer to home. Gaps still exist among European countries, in terms of planning and preparedness for acts of cyber-crime.  Only a small number of Member States have adopted national cyber-security strategies or carried out national cyber-incident exercises.  National capabilities, such as setting-up Computer Emergency Response Teams, are essential for Europe to be able to co-operate in the event of a serious incident, yet progress in building these capabilities is uneven. The European Commission is actively supporting Member States in this process, together with the European Network and Information Security Agency (ENISA).  We’re also doing our part, for example by building up a Computer Emergency Response Team for the EU institutions from June onwards, and establishing a European Cybercrime Centre by 2013. It is now ten years since the Council of Europe Convention on Cybercrime was opened for signature in Budapest. It is still not ratified by all European countries.  I find this frustrating; if cyber-criminals are not constrained by borders then neither should Europe’s cyber-security defences.
Tags
Categories

Comments

  • gr33n's picture

    "It is now ten years since the Council of Europe Convention on Cybercrime was opened for signature in Budapest. It is still not ratified by all European countries.  I find this frustrating; if cyber-criminals are not constrained by borders then neither should Europe’s cyber-security defences." Das ist, mit Vorlaub gesagt, naiv. Erstens ist der Europarat ein Forum für Diplomaten, das nur in Bezug auf Osteuropa eine Bedeutung hat, und in dem normalerweise Ratifikation nicht kustomarisch ist. Zweitens spricht nichts dagegen entsprechende Regeln zunächst auf der EU-Ebene zu harmonisieren Drittens fragt man sich, was diese Regeln überhaupt beim Europarat zu tun hatten? Gerade weil noch keine korrespondierenden EU-Regeln bestanden. Man kann sich des Verdachts nicht erwehren, dass der Europarat auf der Suche nach "neuen Geschäftsfeldern" war und da auf amerikanische Lobbyisten traf, denen nicht klar war welche Funktion der Europarat innerhalb der regionalen Governanzarchitektur Europas hat. Immerhin haben sie in der Folge Regierungen zur Ratifikation gedrängt. Als EU-Verantwortliche sollte man aber darauf hinwirken den Europarat aus allem nach Möglichkeit rauszuhalten. Man sollte auch verstehen, dass das, was der Europarat dort verbrochen hat, schwer im Magen liegt. Im Gegensatz zu EU-Regeln und nationalen Gesetzen sind die Konventionen des Europarates nicht so leicht reformierbar. Man erreicht eine Art "Flüssigbeton" im internationalen Recht, das dem demokratischen Gesetzgeber die Flexibilität nimmt. Und dann sind da wirklich ohne jede demokratische Debatte sehr aggressive Forderungen niedergelegt worden z.B. Überwachung, Article 20/21
  • His Royal Emporer Highnes Emporer Big Rene's picture

    It is impossible to make a save system, everything is hackable... just contact me and I will explain it to you...
  • Data Recovery NJ's picture

    Ever think of doing a review of data recovery hardware ??
  • Martin Ward's picture

    The headline “Time to get serious about cyber-crime” gave me the creeps and reading that EU delegates meet with sickos of the US Homeland Security frightens me even further: Orwell’s dreadful vision is getting on. Are there any plans for surrounding the EU with a great firewall yet–by courtesy of the People’s Republic of China, featuring Mrs. “Censilia” Malmström and Karl-Theodor “Xerox” zu Guttenberg? What else may result from a conversation with the american crooks? Nothing good, in any case...
  • Georg | Nerdzine's picture

    Cyber Crime is growing every year. Especially the hacker, who attacks organisations because of politics. Look at Kim Schmitz (founder oft Megaupload)... after he have been arested the website of the gouvernment have been attacked.

Add new comment

CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions.
Image CAPTCHA
Enter the characters shown in the image.