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 1  of  5 
I-090042
Ref: I-090042
Date: 05/06/2014

I-075210
Ref: I-075210
Date: 10/11/2012

I-068244
Ref: I-068244
Date: 08/12/2010
COP 16, Cancún: joint press conference by Connie Hedegaard and Jo Leinen, Chairman of the EP Delegation
The United Nations Climate Change Conference was held in Cancún, Mexico, from 29 November to 10 December 2010. It encompassed the sixteenth Conference of the Parties (COP) and the sixth Conference of the Parties serving as the Meeting of the Parties to the Kyoto Protocol (CMP). For the EU, the ultimate objective of the UN process should be to establish an ambitious, comprehensive and legally binding global framework that engaged all countries in combating climate change. This framework should build on the Kyoto Protocol and the Copenhagen Accord, which was reached at the 2009 UN climate conference, and has been endorsed by 140 countries including the EU and its Member States. The Copenhagen Accord recognised the need to keep global warming below 2°C compared to the pre-industrial temperature. The EU's preference was for the future global climate framework to take the form of a single, new legally binding instrument which included the essential elements of the Kyoto Protocol. However, the EU was willing to consider a second commitment period of the Kyoto Protocol on condition that this forms part of a wider global agreement which engaged all major economies in climate action and that the environmental integrity of the Protocol was improved. On 8 December 2010, Connie Hedegaard, Member of the EC in charge of Climate Action, and Jo Leinen, Member of the EP, gave a joint press conference to explain the relevance of the subjects.

I-068245
Ref: I-068245
Date: 08/12/2010
COP 16, Cancún: extracts from the joint press conference by Connie Hedegaard and Jo Leinen, Chairman of the EP Delegation
The United Nations Climate Change Conference was held in Cancún, Mexico, from 29 November to 10 December 2010. It encompassed the sixteenth Conference of the Parties (COP) and the sixth Conference of the Parties serving as the Meeting of the Parties to the Kyoto Protocol (CMP). For the EU, the ultimate objective of the UN process should be to establish an ambitious, comprehensive and legally binding global framework that engaged all countries in combating climate change. This framework should build on the Kyoto Protocol and the Copenhagen Accord, which was reached at the 2009 UN climate conference, and has been endorsed by 140 countries including the EU and its Member States. The Copenhagen Accord recognised the need to keep global warming below 2°C compared to the pre-industrial temperature. The EU's preference was for the future global climate framework to take the form of a single, new legally binding instrument which included the essential elements of the Kyoto Protocol. However, the EU was willing to consider a second commitment period of the Kyoto Protocol on condition that this forms part of a wider global agreement which engaged all major economies in climate action and that the environmental integrity of the Protocol was improved. On 8 December 2010, Connie Hedegaard, Member of the EC in charge of Climate Action, and Jo Leinen, Member of the EP, gave a joint press conference to explain the relevance of the subjects.

I-067550
Ref: I-067550
Date: 06/10/2010

I-030365
Ref: I-030365
Date: 12/04/2000
IGC: Adapting the Institutions to make a success of enlargement (Dimitrakopoulos and Leinen Reports), EP Plenary Session
Giorgos Dimitrakopoulos and Jo Leinen, members of the EP, reported for the Constitutional Affairs Committee with Parliament's practical proposals for the intergovernmental conference (IGC). Their report is based on a clear principle: the composition, functioning and balance of the Union's institutions must reflect its 'dual legitimacy' both as a union of peoples and as a union of states, striking an overall balance between the small and large states and peoples, and taking account of the fact that the union of peoples is represented by the European Parliament and the union of states by the Council. In the light of this, the report does not simply deal with the 'Amsterdam left-overs' but covers a range of institutional matters regarded as crucial if the Union is to function more efficiently.The reporters advocate extending the use of qualified majority voting to all legislative decisions and want all these matters to come under the codecision procedure. The unanimity requirement in Council should be limited to decisions of a constitutional nature. Parliament should, under the assent procedure, take part in the procedure for revising the treaties and this procedure should also be used for all international agreements relating to areas for which the codecision procedure is used internally. Their report also says that Council measures requiring a qualified majority should be adopted if they secure the support of at least a simple majority of members representing at least the majority of the total population of the Member States of the Union (a 'double majority').

I-077288
Ref: I-077288
Date: 11/04/2013

I-070041
Ref: I-070041
Date: 24/05/2011

I-070036
Ref: I-070036
Date: 24/05/2011

I-070035
Ref: I-070035
Date: 24/05/2011

46 Results
 1  of  5 


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