Together Against Trafficking in Human Beings

United Nations

United Nations

The Forced Labour Convention (C29)

Adopted on 28 June 1930 and entered into force on 1 May 1932

The Convention was the first international instrument which required the suppression of enforced labour in all its forms. The Forced Labour Convention paved the way for the 1956 Supplementary Convention on the Abolition of Slavery, the Slave Trade, and Institutions and Practices Similar to Slavery.

The Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW)

The Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) adopted by the UN General Assembly on 18 December 1979, is often described as an international bill of rights for women. It entered into force as an international treaty on 3 September 1981 after the twentieth country had ratified it.

The Convention

Model Law against Trafficking in Persons

United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, Vienna, 2009, 100 pages

The UNODC Model Law against Trafficking in Persons was developed by the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) to assist States in implementing the United Nations Convention against Transnational Organized Crime.

It is designed to be adaptable to the needs of each State, whatever its legal tradition and social, economic, cultural and geographical conditions.

1921 International Convention for the Suppression of the Traffic in Women and Children

The 1921 International Convention for the Suppression of the Traffic in Women and Children (1921 Convention) was concluded and adopted under the auspices of the newly established League of Nations. Primarily, this Convention built on the recommendations contained in the Final Act of the International Conference, which was summoned by the Council of the League of Nations between June 30 and July 5, 1921.

Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child on the sale of children, child prostitution and child pornography

Adopted and opened for signature, ratification and accession by General Assembly resolution A/RES/54/263 of 25 May 2000. It entered into force on 18 January 2002.

The  Optional Protocol on the sale of children, child prostitution and child pornography supplements the Convention on the rights of the Child by providing States with detailed requirements to end the sexual exploitation and abuse of children.  It also protects children from being sold for non-sexual purposes such as forced labour, illegal adoption and organ donation.

The United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC)

Adopted and opened for signature, ratification and accession by General Assembly resolution 44/25 of 20 November 1989, entered into force on 2 September 1990.

The Convention is the most widely ratified human rights convention. The Convention deals with the child-specific needs and rights.

Supplementary Convention on the Abolition of Slavery, the Slave Trade, and Institutions and Practices Similar to Slavery

The United Nations 1956 Supplementary Convention on the Abolition of Slavery, the Slave Trade, and Institutions and Practices Similar to Slavery

Adopted on 7 September 1956 and entered into force on 30 April 1957, in accordance with Article 13.

The treaty supplements the 1926 Convention by acting to ban debt bondage, serfdom, servile marriage and child servitude. Slave trafficking, enslavement and giving others into slavery are also prohibited by the convention.

Convention for the Suppression of the Traffic in Persons and of the Exploitation of the Prostitution of Others

The Convention for the Suppression of the Traffic in Persons and of the Exploitation of the Prostitution of Others was ppproved by the General Assembly on 2 December 1949 and came into effect on 25 July 1951.

1933 International Convention for the Suppression of the Traffic in Women of the Full Age

The 1933 International Convention for the Suppression of the Traffic in Women of the Full Age ('1933 Convention') was employed under the League of Nations and recapped the wish to more completely secure the suppression of trafficking in women and children. This convention followed up on the recommendations contained in the Report to the Council of the League of Nations by the Traffic in Women and Children Committee on the Work of its Twelfth Session.

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