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United Nations Last update : 15.06.2012

  • Supplementary Convention on the Abolition of Slavery, the Slave Trade, and Institutions and Practices Similar to Slavery

    The United Nations 1956 Supplementary Convention on the Abolition of Slavery, the Slave Trade, and Institutions and Practices Similar to Slavery

    Adopted on 7 September 1956 and entered into force on 30 April 1957, in accordance with Article 13.

    The treaty supplements the 1926 Convention by acting to ban debt bondage, serfdom, servile marriage and child servitude. Slave trafficking, enslavement and giving others into slavery are also prohibited by the convention.

  • Convention for the Suppression of the Traffic in Persons and of the Exploitation of the Prostitution of Others

    The Convention for the Suppression of the Traffic in Persons and of the Exploitation of the Prostitution of Others was ppproved by the General Assembly on 2 December 1949 and came into effect on 25 July 1951.

    The Convention for the Suppression of the Traffic in Persons and of the Exploitation of the Prostitution of Others proclaims that "the traffic in persons for the purpose of prostitution is incompatible with the dignity and worth of the human person". The Convention prescribes procedures for combating international trafficking for prostitution, including expulsion of offenders. It also prohibits the running of brothels and renting accommodation for prostitution purposes. The definition of trafficking of this convention was departed from in the Trafficking protocol to the United Nations Convention against Transnational Organized Crime.

     

  • 1926 Slavery Convention

    The Convention to Suppress the Slave Trade and Slavery known as the Slavery Convention, signed on September 25, 1926 and entered in to force on 7 March 1927.

    This convention was created under the auspices of the League of Nations and serves as the foundation for the prevention and suppression of the slave trade. With the 1926 Slavery Convention, concrete rules and articles were decided upon, and slavery and slave trade were banned.  The definition of slavery is further refined and extended by the 1956 Supplementary Convention.

  • 1933 International Convention for the Suppression of the Traffic in Women of the Full Age

    The 1933 International Convention for the Suppression of the Traffic in Women of the Full Age ('1933 Convention') was employed under the League of Nations and recapped the wish to more completely secure the suppression of trafficking in women and children. This convention followed up on the recommendations contained in the Report to the Council of the League of Nations by the Traffic in Women and Children Committee on the Work of its Twelfth Session.

    Article 1 of the 1933 Convention extends the punishable requirements of trafficking to include 'attempted offences, and within the legal limits, acts preparatory to the offences in question'. Additionally, the term 'country' is widened to include the colonies and protectorates of the parties concerned, as well as the territories under them.

  • 1921 International Convention for the Suppression of the Traffic in Women and Children

    The 1921 International Convention for the Suppression of the Traffic in Women and Children (1921 Convention) was concluded and adopted under the auspices of the newly established League of Nations. Primarily, this Convention built on the recommendations contained in the Final Act of the International Conference, which was summoned by the Council of the League of Nations between June 30 and July 5, 1921.

    Article 2 of the 1921 Convention particularly recognises the trafficking in children of both sexes. Article 5 raises the age limit for protection from twenty to 'twenty-one completed years of age'.

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