Together Against Trafficking in Human Beings

GRETA reports released

GRETA reports released

The Council of Europe's Group of Experts on Action against Trafficking in Human Beings (GRETA) is responsible for monitoring the implementation of the Council of Europe Convention on Action against Trafficking in Human Beings, in force in 34 countries in Europe. GRETA makes recommendations to the Members States concerning the measures to be taken as a follow-up to its reports.

Between September 2010 and June 2011, GRETA evaluated the first ten countries which became Parties to the Convention (Albania, Austria, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Denmark, Georgia, Moldova, Romania and the Slovak Republic).

On the 1st of September 2011, Greta has released its 1st General Report providing information on the procedural and organisational framework for its activities and its working methods. The report stresses that to enhance the effectiveness of international action against trafficking in human beings, it is necessary to increase co-ordination by international organisations in the different types of activities

In its first evaluation report, released the 12th of September 2011, GRETA takes stock of the measures taken by Cyprus like the adoption of a comprehensive anti-trafficking law and the abolition of the so-called "artiste visas", which favoured trafficking of women for the purpose of sexual exploitation.

In Austria report, released on the 15th of September 2011, GRETA notes the significant measures taken by the Austrian authorities including the setting up of a co-ordinating body to combat trafficking in human beings and efforts to raise public awareness and train professionals.

In Slovak report, released on the 19th of September 2011, GRETA notes in particular the creation of Expert Group for Combating Trafficking in Human Beings, a multidisciplinary entity composed of relevant public bodies and non-governmental organisations and the adoption and implementation of multiannual National Action Plans.

In Croatia report, released on the 30th of November 2011, GRETA welcomes the measures taken by the Croatian authorities including the appointment of a National Co-ordinator for Combating Trafficking in Human Beings and the establishment of a National Committee for Combating Trafficking in Human Beings, which brings together all relevant actors, including non-governmental organisations. Furthermore, multi-disciplinary mobile teams have been set up to assist victims of trafficking as well as to participate in their identification.

In Albania report, released on the 2nd of December 2011, GRETA notes the significant measures taken by the Albanian authorities to prevent and combat trafficking in human beings. These measures have included the setting up the Office of the National Co-ordinator for the fight against trafficking and the establishment of a national referral mechanism for the identification of and assistance to victims of trafficking.

In Bulgaria report, released on the 14th of December 2011, GRETA welcomes the important steps taken by the Bulgarian authorities to prevent and combat trafficking in human beings. These measures have included the adoption of a specific law to address human trafficking, increased penalties for trafficking offenses, and criminalisation of the use of services of victims of trafficking. Co-ordination of the efforts of relevant actors is ensured through the National Commission for Combating Trafficking in Human Beings, seven local commissions, and a national mechanism for referral and support of trafficked persons.

In Denmark report, released on the 20th of December 2011, GRETA notes the important steps taken by the Danish authorities to combat trafficking in human beings, including the setting up of the Danish Centre against Human Trafficking, the establishment of an Inter-Ministerial Working Group on Human Trafficking, and the adoption of multiannual national anti-trafficking action plans, the latest covering the period 2011-2014.

In the report on Georgia, released on the 7th of February 2012, GRETA recognizes the progress made by the Georgian authorities in combating trafficking in human beings, such as the adoption of a specific anti-trafficking law, the setting up of the Interagency Co-ordination Council against trafficking in human beings and a State Fund for the protection and assistance of victims of trafficking, the increasing of the budgetary allocation for victim support, the increased  attention paid to awareness raising, education and training. However, GRETA stresses the importance of taking action to address the socio-economic vulnerability to trafficking of internally-displaced persons, potential migrants and children.

In the report on the Republic of Moldova, released on the 22nd of February 2012, GRETA notes the steps taken by the Moldovan authorities to combat trafficking in human beings, through the adoption of specific anti-trafficking legislation and putting into place a National Referral System for Assistance and Protection of Victims and Potential Victims of Trafficking. However, GRETA urges the Moldovan authorities to develop and implement further measures to identify victims and potential victims of trafficking. Particular attention should be paid to groups vulnerable to trafficking, such as women from socially disadvantaged families, women subjected to domestic violence, children left without parental care and children placed in state institutions.

 

See also

GRETA Report UK

GRETA Report Romania