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Statistics   vertical line   The 2003 Agricultural Year

Overview

1.

The 2003 agricultural year was marked by lower production for both crops and livestock products, with the notable exceptions of milk and pig meat. This fall was partly offset by a fairly favourable price trend. Inflation allowed for, input prices were lower except for energy whereas agricultural prices were on the whole unchanged. Price rhythms were highly variable by sector and country but there were increases for all cereals, fruits and vegetables, wine, poultry and eggs, and falls for sugarbeet, potatoes, pigmeat and milk. Under these circumstances agricultural income rose very slightly for the Union as a whole (+ 0.9 % in real terms). The actual range by country was from -14 % for Germany to + 20 % for the United Kingdom.

2.

The autumn 2002 sowing weather had been generally favourable but a dry and cold winter and early spring followed that destroyed some of the winter cereal and oilseed rape sown, particularly in Central Europe. The late spring and summer then saw poor rainfall and very high temperatures (4° to 5°C above average) in the greater part of Europe but not the Scandinavian and Baltic countries. Temperatures peaked in the first three weeks of August, which saw a higher death rate in certain animal species (poultry and piglets). The countries most affected by the long period of high temperatures were Portugal, Spain, France, Germany, Italy, Greece and most Central European countries.

These very difficult weather conditions and the accompanying measures needed in some regions (restrictions on irrigation) reduced crop production very markedly. On the livestock side, the drought effected the yields from animals kept outside (cattle, sheep, goats) owing to the lower productivity of meadows and grazing, while the impact of the extremely high temperatures was more on animals reared indoors, particularly poultry and pigs, the effects being slower growth, higher death rates and lower fertility.

3.

Demand for cereals within the Union is estimated 1 % lower compared to the 2002/03 marketing year, almost exclusively in feedgrain demand, down from 120 to 118 million tonnes. For the livestock products, meat consumption was generally higher except for poultry. The increase in bovine meat took consumption back to the level before the 2001 BSE (bovine spongiform encephalitis) crisis. This increase in demand was chiefly satisfied by higher imports, mainly from South America. Poultrymeat and egg consumption were however lower. Production fell in consequence of the spring 2003 fowl pest epidemic affecting principally the Netherlands but also Belgium and Germany, leading to high prices. Sheepmeat and goatmeat consumption was only slightly up (+ 1.3 %) and has not yet reached the level of the year 2000 before the United Kingdom foot-and-mouth epidemic. Consumption of milk products, after a slight fall in 2002, resumed its trend of slight upward growth (+ 0.6 %). Demand for butter is still stable but the increase in cheese consumption slide down in 2003 (+ 0.9 % compared with trend growth of 2.3 %).

4.

Mainly owing to a fall in oil prices, the world economy continued to show a strong growth in 2003 (some 3.3 % for gross domestic production). In the European Union however, besides the geopolitical tensions over the war in Iraq, other factors including difficulties on the labour market, poor stock market performance and uncertainty over the future of social security systems helped hold back the upswing, which came only in the second half of the year, and GDP growth for the entire year was restricted to 0.8 %. At the same time the monetary and budgetary policies applied in the European Union boosted the financial Community's confidence in the euro, which in 2003 rose significantly against most other currencies (by around 13 %) against the US dollar it rose more than 20 %, closing the year at $1.25.

5.

The world economic upswing together with low growth in agricultural production led to higher prices on the world market for most products in 2003.In the case of cereals world wheat prices (in dollars) were higher than in 2002 in the first half of the year but subsequently fell given the satisfactory summer 2003 harvest in the main traditional exporters (USA, Canada, Australia, Mercosur, apart from EU-15) and despite very poor production by the new exporters (including the Ukraine, Russia and the CEECs). With the dollar's fall against the euro, from the month of June, world wheat prices in euros were 10 % to 33 % lower than 2002 prices. The EU production deficit led to a substantial rise in European cereal prices.

At the beginning of the year the maize price was close to that of 2002. The poor crops in Argentina, Brazil, South Africa, China and Europe were partly offset by high production in the United States but this could not stop a rise in coarse grain prices (maize, sorghum, barley) from the autumn. The market remained unstable owing to uncertainty over the attitude of China, veering between the need to look to its own supply and its role as a maize exporter.

World market prices for soya were slightly up on 2002 at the beginning of the year and then rose very markedly from the summer under strong demand from China and from the animal feed industry for the oil-crushing by-products (because of the coarse grain shortage) when both North and South American production was down. In addition the strong Asiatic demand more than doubled freight costs. But big stocks in Argentina and Brazil relieved prices.

Despite low growth in demand meat prices were generally higher on world markets owing to generally restricted supply, to which were added health problems and import restrictions. To encourage expansion of national production Russia introduced tariff quotas for meat imports and Japan used the safeguard clause against pigmeat imports for the third year in a row. The countries of South America, particularly Brazil, continued to increase their market shares, exchange rates still being favourable. Discovery of a cow infected with BSE in Canada disturbed the bovine meat markets well beyond North America. The strong world market rise for poultrymeat eased off markedly in 2003 since the epidemic of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) in Asia led to a considerable cut-back in demand. Although the fowl pest epidemic in the Netherlands restricted availability on the world markets, prices were forced down by high supply volumes from Brazil and Thailand. For sheepmeat on the other hand, the drought in Australia and structural supply weakness in several Northern Hemisphere countries meant a big rise in prices.

After the heavy fall at the beginning of 2002, world milk prices continued to recover in 2003 owing to sustained demand but poor supply availability (Oceania, South America, Europe). The increase was particularly marked in the second half of the year, more specifically for butter and cheese. As a result export subsidies fell in both North America and Europe.

6.

In the first eight months of 2003 the overall value of Community agricultural exports rose by 4 % over the same period in 2002. The increase was particularly marked for wines and spirits, sugars and sugar products and chocolate and chocolate products. It was also noteworthy for cereals (6.3 %) owing to large volumes at the beginning of the year but there is a risk of reversal of the situation between now and the end of the year. The production deficit led to a suspension of the weekly export tenders for cereals (except for Finnish and Swedish oats) from August. For pigmeat exports the situation was difficult owing to restrictions on access to certain markets (Japan, Russia) and strong competition from other exporters (Brazil, Poland). Poultrymeat exports fell substantially owing to the production shortfall caused by fowl pest. The overall value of imports was practically unchanged (up 0.42 %) despite marked increases for animal products (live animals, meat, milk products). Thus in 2003 the European Union was a net importer of bovine meat for the first time in 20 years. Turning to cereals, introduction in January 2003 of tariff quotas for low and medium quality wheats and for barley curbed the massive imports of 2002 from the Black Sea. Overall the export balance for the first eight months of the year was slightly positive (EUR 468 million) whereas it had been negative (EUR 479 million) for the same period in 2002.

7.

For most products intervention stocks fell in 2003, a sign of improved markets. Cereal stocks dropped from 8 million tonnes in January to 5.1 million in December and are expected to fall further. In particular the large rye stock was reduced from 5.3 to 3.8 million tonnes. On the other hand rice stocks reached the exceptional level of 700 000 tonnes. Despite the poor harvest for the second year running total wine stocks held up in 2003. Those of wine alcohol in contrast fell by nearly 30 % to around 2.4 million hectolitres of pure alcohol. Intervention stocks of bovine meat were fully disposed of and there only remains some 34 000 tonnes (carcase equivalent) in store from the special purchase scheme at the time of the BSE crisis. The picture for milk products was less favourable. Over the year butter stocks rose by only 32 000 tonnes to reach 224 000 tonnes but the rise for skimmed milk powder was from 142 000 to 198 000 tonnes.

Production

8.

The latest information is that the 2003/04 cereal area at 36.4 million hectares is down by 2.6 % on 2002/03, a fall that was curbed by new spring sowings following the winter frosts. All cereal areas were down on last year apart from barley, oats and sorghum (small rises). The biggest falls were 17 % for rye and 4 % for common and durum wheat.

Total cereal production for 2003/04 is at present estimated at 185 million tonnes, a fall of nearly 25 million tonnes or 12 % on 2002/03. Yield would be 5.11 t/ha, 9 % less than last year and 14 % down on the long-term trend. For common wheat the forecast is 84 million tonnes, 10 million (10 %) less than in 2002/03. For all cereals production is put lower than last year, with falls ranging from 5 % for barley (45 million tonnes) to 31 % for rye (3 million tonnes). Also particularly large is the 20 % fall for maize, which suffered greatly from the drought and the summer heatwave. The current estimate is 31 million tonnes.

Yields are without exception poorer than in 2002/03. The biggest fall is 19 % for maize to 7.4 t/ha, followed by those for rye (-16 %), triticale (-9 %) and oats (-8 %). For common wheat the yield of 6.2 t/ha is 7 % lower than last year.

France remains the leading cereal grower, totalling 57 million tonnes despite an 18 % fall on 2002/03. It is followed by Germany at 40 million tonnes (down 8 %) and the United Kingdom at 22 million tonnes (down 5 %). Only Denmark and Ireland produced a little more than last year.

9.

Rice was also affected by the drought. The 2003 production estimate is 5.2 % lower at around 1.5 million tonnes (milled equivalent).

10.

Oilseed areas were higher: rape up 5 % to 3.2 million ha, sunflower up 4 % to 1.7 million ha and soya up 6 % to 260 000 ha, increases due to good price prospects for rape prices and a need to resow winter sunflower and soya owing to frost damage. Total oilseed area is currently estimated at 5.2 million ha, including 800 000 ha of non-food crops. But with the difficult weather conditions yields are down on 2002, by 5 % for rape, 13 % for sunflower and 12 % for soya, giving total production of 12.5 million tonnes, 2 % less than for 2002/03. Of this just over 2 million tonnes is estimated as non-food, nearly all of it rape. The 2003/04 crop would be 9.3 million tonnes of rape, 2.5 million tonnes of sunflower and 750 000 tonnes of soya.

11.

For the same reasons as for sunflower and soya there was a marked increase in the area sown to protein crops recorded in 2003, up 9 % to 1.35 million ha. Despite lower yields than in 2002 the production estimate is 4.3 million tonnes, up 6 %, with the increase chiefly for peas (up 12 %) while field beans and sweet lupins will be 10 % down on 2002/03.

12.

The linseed area has settled at a very low level in recent years (60 000 hectares) and the 2003 production estimate is 70 000 tonnes.

13.

EU sugar production in 2003 is estimated at 15.1 million tonnes, some 10 % lower than the 16.9 million tonnes of 2002 mainly as a result of an overall fall of about 7 % in area sown (2003 estimate 1.7 million ha) and the impact of the prolonged drought on yields, particularly in southern Europe (Italy down 30 %, Spain 25 %). In the northern countries (France, United Kingdom, Netherlands) higher sugar contents meant normal per hectare sugar yields. In Germany the joint result of a 3 % drop in area and a 5 % drop in yield was an 8 % fall in production.

14.

Olive oil production in 2003 is estimated as falling by some 500 000 tonnes (20 %) from the record EU level of 2002. Despite this, production is still at a high level.

15.

Initial estimates give a fall in fruit production of 2 % to 7 % according to product. Crop figures are also lower for the main vegetables except tomatoes for industrial processing, which had a very low 2002 crop. For potatoes the estimate is a 13 % fall.

16.

Community wine production in 2003 at 157 million hectolitres (down 2.1 % on 2002) was the lowest since 1996. This masks contrasts between producer countries. The hot dry summer particularly affected Germany and Luxembourg (both down 21 % on 2002) and France (down 9 %). Italian and Austrian production was stable. Spanish production at 42.5 million hl was 7 % up, as was that of Portugal, and Greece was 19 % up. The production fall affected quality wines (quality wines psr) more than table wines, since the two countries most affected are big producers of the former.

17.

Bovine meat production, in a cyclical fall beginning in 2002, is estimated at 7.3 million tonnes, down 2.35 %, for 2003. Particularly marked falls in Germany, the Netherlands and Belgium (down 9 %) were partly offset by rises of 10 % in Spain and 3 % in Ireland.

18.

After the cyclical low of 2001 the upswing in pigmeat production seen in 2002 (1.5 %) lasted longer than expected in 2003. In the first half the structural reductions continued in the Netherlands, Belgium and the United Kingdom but production continued to grow in Germany, Spain and France. The downswing began in the second half in most countries and the production estimate for the year is 0.8 % up at 17.9 million tonnes.

19.

After the last three years’ growth poultrymeat production was expected to fall slightly in 2003. The impact of the fowl pest epidemic in the Netherlands, detection of nitrofuran in Portugal and the intense summer heat however meant that the fall in production was greater than expected, to 8.67 million tonnes, 4.5 % down on 2002.

20.

There was a very small increase (0.4 %) in sheepmeat/goatmeat production in 2003. Falls occurred in Greece, Italy and France and growth was only 1.4 % in the United Kingdom, which has still not returned to its level of production before the 2001 foot-and-mouth epidemic.

21.

The downward trend in dairy cow numbers is expected continued and reached 19.1 million head at the end of year, a 1.7 % fall on 2002. The estimate of average milk yield on the other hand is 6 276 kilos, up 2.4 %. This gives a milk production figure of 121.7 million tonnes, practically unchanged on 2002. Deliveries to dairies should be unchanged at 115.6 million tonnes.

After the 2002 increase butter production should be down by 0.5 % in 2003. Cheese production has not stopped growing but in the last few years the rise has been easing: this year’s overall increase of only 0.7 % (well below the historic average of around 2.2 % a year) results in production of 7.3 million tonnes. For milk powders a fall of 1.2 %, about 24 000 tonnes, to 1.98 million tonnes is expected, all on the whole milk side: production of semi-skimmed and skimmed milk powders is very stable.

Prices

Producer prices

22.

The figures available in December 2003 show a 3.9 % rise in nominal terms in the agriculture producer price index for the European Union as a whole. There are wide differences between cereals: common wheat up 7.5 %, malting barley up 6.0 %, feed barley up 5.9 %, grain maize up 3.0 %, but durum wheat down 1.0 %, rice down 3.2 % and oats down 6.2 %. After the big falls of 2002 the sugarbeet price fell again, by 3.4 %, but that of potatoes rose 9.8 %. Wine, up 8.4 %, and olive oil, up 3.3 %, rose for a second year and the price index for the horticulture sector has been in continuous rise since 2000, with fresh fruit up 13.8 %, dry fruits up 8.2 %, fresh vegetables up 11.9 % and flowers up 2.6 %. The overall index for animal products rose by a mere 0.6 % but this masks wide-ranging changes by sector: beef up 2.5 %, veal up 7.2 %, sheepmeat up 2.5 %, poultry up 3.6 % and eggs up 15.8 %, but after the big falls of 2002 there were further falls in 2003 of 4.5 % for pigmeat and 1.7 % for milk.

23.

When inflation is taken into account the estimated producer price index for the whole European Union is up only 1.4 % on 2002. Owing mainly to favourable price movements for wine, fruit and vegetables there were rises of 4.7 % for Greece, 3 % for Portugal, 2.8 % for Spain and 2.7 % for Italy. In the United Kingdom, up 4.4 %, prices moved favourably for both crops and animal products. In Belgium, up 0.5 %, the rise for animal products offset the fall for crops. With high crop prices failing to offset lower animal product prices there were falls of 6.4 % in Finland, 2.8 % in Austria, 2.3 % in Luxembourg, 1.8 % in Germany, 0.7 % in the Netherlands and 0.6 % in France. Lower prices in real terms for both types of product meant falls of 3.2 % in Sweden, 4.7 % in Ireland and 5.9 % in Denmark.

Market prices

24.

In general cereal prices stayed at a lower level than in 2002 during the first half of the year (EUR 122 to EUR 126 per tonne for breadmaking common wheat and maize and EUR 110 to EUR 115 for feed wheat and barley). They were fairly stable except that a big fall for oats began in April. The only products enjoying better prices during this half were breadmaking rye, which suffered from very low prices in 2002, and malting barley. The poor 2003 crop then ensured big rises in all cereal prices from the summer. By the end of year they were (per tonne) above EUR 160 for wheat, above EUR 165 for maize, EUR 185 for durum wheat and above EUR 140 for barley. At such price levels for maize our border protection is practically nil, which means no import levy abatement (“abbatamiento”) for Portugal and Spain.

25.

Olive oil prices began the year higher than in 2002 but from May rose steadily until in November they were 40 % to 50 % higher than in 2002.

26.

In general wine prices were slightly up on 2002 but this figure masks varying movements by wine category, region and country.

27.

With demand for bovine meat still in the post‑BSE recovery stage prices continued to improve in 2003. For young bulls they were close to those prevailing before Agenda 2000 at the beginning of the year (EUR 280 to EUR 285 per 100 kg for category R3 up to mid‑March) but the seasonal fall was more marked and the recovery weak. Thus at the end of the year prices were at slightly lower levels than at the same time in 2002. The price of cows (category R3) rose in the first half to EUR 234/100 kg by mid‑June and stayed at EUR 225 to EUR 230 in the second half, i.e. 3 % to 7 % above the 2002 level. Steer prices, which had fallen in 2002, did not improve in 2003. They stayed nearly all year at EUR 250 to EUR 260 per 100 kg, which for the end of the year corresponded to the 2001 and 2002 prices.

28.

The decline for pigmeat prices that began in 2002 continued, bottoming out at EUR 120/100 kg at the end of May. Prices then steadily improved to peak at EUR 144/100 kg in mid‑September, only to fall abruptly and settle in the EUR 120 to EUR 126 range from mid‑October to year end.

29.

In the first quarter of 2003 poultrymeat prices fluctuated between EUR 128 and EUR 133 per 100 kg, the lowest level for that time of year since 1996. The subsequent fowl pest epidemic in the Netherlands followed by the intense summer heat brought prices up to a record level of EUR 166/100 kg in the first week of September. Gradual resumption of Dutch production then brought prices back to more normal but still satisfactory levels (EUR 145 at end‑October). Particularly noteworthy was the spectacular rise in Spanish prices from around EUR 100/100 kg in June to more than EUR 150 from mid‑July to mid‑September. They fell back again to EUR 100 in mid‑October. Egg prices maintained record levels from April to August (12 % to 20 % above the seasonal average of recent years). As the upswing was slow to arrive and stocks became limited they again rose abruptly from September, reaching EUR 128/100 kg in October (40 % above the seasonal average).

30.

Since sheepmeat production had not yet got back to normal levels in the United Kingdom prices stayed high in 2003 for the third year in a row. Slightly lower than those of 2002 at the beginning, they increased strongly from March to move up from EUR 400/100 kg to the record level of EUR 470 at the end of April (up 21 % on 2002). The seasonal trend took them down again to end the year just below the level seen in 2002.

31.

The very low prices for milk products of 2002 did not improve much in 2003. Only from mid‑July to September in the case of skimmed milk powder and from May to mid‑September for butter were they slightly higher than in 2002. Thus there was intervention purchasing in 2003 but not to the extent of 2002.

Input prices

32.

In 2003 the purchase price index for standard consumption goods and services in agriculture rose by 1.2 % in nominal terms over 2002. Except for animal feed, down 1.5 %, all items were higher.

33.

After allowing for inflation the index was 1 % down in real terms and only three items were up: energy (3.8 %), maintenance and repair of equipment (1.9 %) and investment in buildings (0.3 %). The horticulture sector’s intensive energy use meant that the index was up by 1.8 % in real terms in the Netherlands. A slight increase of 0.6 % was also seen in Germany. In all other countries the index was down, by as much as 6.6 % in Portugal and 3.4 % in Denmark. The other countries with a fall above the Community average were France (-1.4 %), Italy (-1.7 %) and Ireland (-1.9 %).

Farm income

34.

The first estimates of farm income movements in 2003 provided by Eurostat on the basis of information sent in by the Member States in December 2003, show an increase over 2002 of 0.9 % in average farm income (measured, in real terms, as the net value added at factor cost per annual work unit) for the European Union[1]. Incomes were up in seven Member States and down in the others, with the biggest increases in the United Kingdom (20.5 %), Belgium (8.6 %), Spain (4.2 %) and Portugal (3.3 %) and the biggest falls in Germany (-14.2 %), Denmark (-7.9 %), Austria (-6.4 %) and Finland (-5.9 %). The main factor behind these changes is poor crop production owing to the summer drought that was not always offset by adequate price increases, while in the livestock sector falls in milk and pigmeat prices following increased production were the primary drag on incomes. Since movements in intermediate consumption costs did not generally offset those in production costs there is an estimated decline of 1.5 % in real terms in farm income for the European Union as a whole in 2003, the only countries showing increases being the United Kingdom (14.9 %), Belgium (5.3 %) Portugal (3.3 %) and Ireland (0.8 %).

[1] At this point the data for Greece had not been sent owing to a strike at the National Statistical Organisation. The estimate is therefore based on data from the other 14 Member States.

35.

Lastly, the structural decline in the agricultural labour force, the final fundamental factor affecting income movement, is assessed at 2.4 % in 2003 for the whole EU. Taking this into account gives an increase of just under 1 % in farm income calculated per person.

 

Changes in nominal farm-gate prices in 2003 and 2002

(%)

Member State

2003/2002 (P)

2002/2001

Crop Products

Livestock products

Total

Crop Products

Livestock Products

Total

EU-15

7.0

0.6

3.9

0.1

-5.7

-2.6

Belgique/België

-1.2

4.0

2.0

-4.5

-9.2

-7.5

Danmark

1.9

-6.2

-3.8

-2.4

-12

-9.1

Deutschland

4.2

-3.3

-0.7

-3.7

-7.5

-6.3

Elláda

11.6

0.8

8.5

8.5

-1.8

5.3

Espańa

9.6

1.5

6.1

0.5

-8.5

-3.7

France

8.0

1.0

1.4

-4.9

-3.8

-4.4

Ireland

3.6

0.4

-0.8

-1.8

-4.8

-4.4

Italia

6.7

3.5

5.6

4.4

-4

1.4

Luxembourg

5.1

-1.6

-0.2

6

-4.1

-2.1

Nederland

4.2

-1.2

1.7

2.6

-7.3

-2.1

Österreich

1.9

-3.2

-1.6

0.3

-7.4

-5.1

Portugal

18.5

2.6

6.4

-10.6

-6

-2.4

Suomi/Finland

1.8

-8.4

-5.1

1

-3.4

-2

Sverige

2.1

-2.7

-1.1

-4.4

-1.8

-2.7

United Kingdom

4.9

6.3

5.8

-4.1

-2.7

-3.3

(P)  provisional

Source : Eurostat

 

Changes in nominal purchase prices for agricultural inputs in 2003 and 2002

                                                                                                                    (%)

Member State

Intermediate

Consumption

Investment

Total

2003/2002(P)

2002/2001

2003/2002(P)

2002/2001

2003/2002(P)

2002/2001

EU-15

1.1

-0.1

2.3

2.5

1.4

0.5

Belgique/België

1.0

0.2

1.3

2.1

0.8

0.5

Danmark

-0.8

-0.7

-1.4

1.2

-0.2

-0.3

Deutschland

1.7

-0.6

0.9

1.3

1.5

-0.1

Elláda

3.5

1.6

3.3

4.0

3.4

2.1

Espańa

2.1

0.7

2.7

3.5

2.1

1.1

France

0.4

-0.1

2.4

2.2

0.9

0.4

Ireland

2.0

1.3

1.4

4.0

1.9

2.1

Italia

0.4

0.2

2.6

2.8

1.3

1.2

Luxembourg

1.2

0.2

1.6

2.3

1.3

1.0

Nederland

1.7

0.7

2.5

3.6

1.9

1.1

Österreich

1.2

-1.4

1.6

2.1

1.4

-0.1

Portugal

0.0

-4.5

3.0

3.0

-3.5

-3.4

Suomi/Finland

1.1

-0.5

2.6

2.9

1.4

0.3

Sverige

1.8

1.7

2.8

3.5

2.0

2.1

United Kingdom

1.2

-0.9

1.5

2.4

1.3

-0.3

(P) provisional

Source : Eurostat


Real output price indices for agricultural products 

                                                                                                                                                 (1995=100)

 

 

 

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003(P)

EU-15

99.0

96.3

91.5

86.4

87.7

89.8

84.9

86.1

Belgique/België

101.4

101.2

94.2

85.4

91.8

91.8

83.7

84.1

Danmark

101.7

99.8

86.6

81.1

88.0

92.3

81.9

77.0

Deutschland

98.3

97.8

92.5

86.3

90.4

94.0

87.0

85.4

Elláda

99.0

96.0

91.1

89.6

90.6

92.9

94.5

98.9

Espańa

98.8

93.9

89.8

85.0

85.9

87.4

81.2

83.5

France

97.7

96.7

95.9

92.3

92.2

93.7

89.4

88.8

Ireland

93.4

86.6

84.1

78.6

79.5

79.9

73.1

69.7

Italia

100.4

99.0

93.9

88.1

87.9

90.2

89.1

91.5

Luxembourg

94.3

95.2

94.3

90.7

88.1

88.0

84.3

82.4

Nederland

101.5

105.9

98.7

91.2

96.0

96.6

91.1

90.5

Österreich

99.9

101.2

93.3

87.1

91.1

95

88.5

86.0

Portugal

99.1

97.9

96.9

90.4

92.2

94

86.6

89.2

Suomi/Finland

104.1

96.5

93.8

87.8

89.6

91.8

88.2

82.5

Sverige

94.7

91.3

89.0

87.3

85.1

87.3

83.3

80.6

United Kingdom

97.4

83.1

73.5

69.4

67.5

71.7

70.3

73.3

(P) provisional

Source : Eurostat

 

Indices of real purchase prices for goods and services currently consumed in agriculture

                                                                                                                                                                                    (1995=100)

 

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003(P)

EU-15

101.8

101.1

96.6

94.1

96.3

97.5

95.5

94.7

Belgique/België

102.1

102.7

98.3

96.6

100.3

100.4

97.5

96.8

Danmark

100.9

101.9

99.1

95.5

95.6

99.9

97.2

94.9

Deutschland

101.6

101.5

98.1

96.9

101.2

102.4

100.9

101.3

Elláda

99.7

96.8

94.4

94.1

96.5

95.3

94.3

94.2

Espańa

100.9

101.7

99.4

96

97.7

96.8

94.5

93.6

France

101.3

101.5

98.7

97.3

99.6

100.5

99.5

98.3

Ireland

101.6

99.3

96

95.1

95.6

96.5

93.9

91.9

Italia

104.6

105.2

97.1

91.4

92.5

94

92.6

91.3

Luxembourg

100.7

100.3

99

98.8

99.5

100.6

99.6

98.7

Nederland

103.7

102.3

98.1

95.8

99.2

101.1

98.4

97.9

Österreich

100.6

100.8

97.9

97.2

98.4

98.3

96.4

96.5

Portugal

100.1

97

92.3

90.4

91.3

93.8

90.9

84.9

Suomi/Finland

100.4

101.1

98.4

97

99.6

98.1

96.5

96.5

Sverige

104.3

103.5

100.8

100.3

102.8

106

106.0

105.7

United Kingdom

98.9

93.6

86.6

84

85.6

88.2

91.8

91.7

(P) provisional

Source : Eurostat


Development of agricultural income in the EU over the 1980-2003 (P) period, in terms of annual

change (%) and cumulative growth (1980 = 100)

(P) Provisional

Source: Eurostat – DG AGRI calculation

 

Development of agricultural income in the EU Member States in 2003 (P) (% change versus 2002)

(P) Provisional

Source: Eurostat – DG AGRI calculation

 

Development of agricultural income in the EU Member States over the 1990 - 2003 period

(average   1994-1996 =100)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1990

1991

1992

1993

1994

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2001

2001

2002

2003(P)

EU-15

108.6 

109.1 

106.3 

102.5 

103.9 

93.5 

102.6 

106.5 

100.6 

93.1 

101.0 

109.3 

106.3 

115.4 

  Belgique/België

91.1 

88.8 

81.1 

78.2 

89.3 

104.9 

105.8 

101.8 

80.0 

79.0 

95.4 

107.3 

87.0 

80.1 

  Danmark

:

86.7 

88.4 

84.6 

90.5 

98.1 

111.3 

114.3 

102.7 

101.0 

124.0 

147.9 

116.7 

100.1 

  Deutschland

88.7 

113.4 

95.7 

88.0 

98.8 

103.1 

98.2 

98.5 

98.7 

101.0 

105.1 

109.0 

114.0 

:

  Elláda

84.9 

84.2 

73.2 

86.4 

96.4 

96.0 

107.6 

108.6 

104.1 

97.6 

108.6 

109.1 

110.3 

114.9 

  Espańa

88.8 

78.2 

85.0 

84.5 

95.9 

101.8 

102.3 

105.9 

110.5 

108.3 

107.7 

109.5 

107.1 

107.8 

  France

77.1 

78.3 

88.7 

90.9 

94.8 

101.4 

103.8 

101.3 

98.0 

93.6 

109.2 

112.5 

104.6 

104.0 

  Ireland

79.0 

84.5 

83.9 

86.2 

92.1 

101.1 

106.8 

109.5 

109.4 

118.0 

113.9 

112.6 

111.3 

111.4 

  Italia

101.9 

93.2 

95.1 

92.7 

91.0 

102.6 

106.4 

97.8 

107.4 

101.3 

102.7 

96.9 

98.1 

96.2 

  Luxembourg

118.6 

117.0 

107.2 

88.4 

99.6 

102.3 

98.1 

105.9 

95.1 

88.4 

89.3 

91.7 

80.7 

81.3 

  Nederland

101.1 

100.9 

94.7 

89.1 

96.1 

105.5 

98.4 

88.3 

85.5 

85.3 

93.4 

107.9 

102.6 

96.1 

  Österreich

94.3 

93.5 

69.9 

67.7 

90.8 

99.7 

109.5 

104.3 

104.6 

125.7 

109.6 

130.7 

126.7 

130.8 

  Portugal

122.4 

106.5 

101.3 

105.3 

94.7 

112.3 

93.0 

92.2 

73.7 

91.5 

120.8 

123.2 

131.1 

123.4 

  Suomi/Finland

113.3 

94.9 

84.4 

88.5 

89.2 

106.3 

104.5 

111.0 

113.8 

100.4 

112.1 

125.9 

124.4 

120.8 

  Sverige

71.6 

70.7 

76.9 

90.3 

96.1 

105.4 

98.6 

76.1 

66.0 

64.6 

61.5 

65.7 

70.2 

84.6 

  United Kingdom

:

86.1 

84.4 

86.4 

94.8 

100.9 

104.4 

104.7 

101.5 

101.2 

106.1 

110.7 

106.4 

107.4 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(P) provisional

Source : Eurostat - Economic Accounts for Agriculture (EAA), Agricultural Income Index

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Agriculture ] - [ Contents ] - [ Foreword ] - [ Codification of the tables ]


 

Agriculture I Top