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Agriculture in the European Union - Statistical and economic information 2000

Economic situation and farm incomes

Overview

1.

The 2000 agricultural year was notable mainly for three trends:(a) the recovery of prices in the pigmeat and poultry sectors after the falls in 1999, (b) a surge in oil prices, leading to a steep rise in energy costs and, to a lesser degree, the cost of fertilisers, and (c) the collapse of consumption and prices of beef and veal from October onwards as a new BSE crisis struck following the discovery of fresh cases of the disease in several Member States. On the whole, weather conditions over the agricultural year were favourable, contributing to a record cereals harvest, while the overall domestic and international economic situation remained conducive to growth and helped ensure EU agricultural exports remained competitive.

2.

Overall, initial estimates at the end of 2000 (before the full impact of the BSE crisis could be assessed) put farm incomes for the European Union as a whole on an upward trend by 1.3% in real terms, following the slight rise recorded in 1999 (+ 0.7%, according to the most recent figures). This provisional estimate for 2000 will probably have to be revised downwards, however, to account for the fall in beef and veal prices in the final quarter of the year. This news should be tempered by the fact that the fall was accompanied by a contrasting recovery in pigmeat and poultry prices, a process that had started before the crisis and which picked up over the year.

3.

In terms of weather conditions, the 2000 agricultural year generally started out quite favourably at the winter sowing period (autumn 1999). This led to an increase in the area sown with common wheat in France, the Benelux countries and especially Germany, compared with the previous year's contraction. In addition, water reserves in southern Europe, low after a summer marked by relatively high temperatures and a long drought in Spain, were replenished by substantial rainfall just before the winter sowing period. This largely offset the mix of low rainfall and above-average temperatures experienced by these regions over the winter. Indeed, most regions in central Europe and Scandinavia also enjoyed a mild winter (with temperatures some 2 degrees above average) and a generally fair spring, with relatively high temperatures accelerating crop growth. In the summer, however, conditions deteriorated somewhat, with excessive rainfall in northern Europe and the unseasonably high temperatures lingering in the south. The heavy rainfall in the north in July and August considerably delayed the winter cereals harvest and affected the quality of the harvested crop. On the other hand, these conditions were relatively favourable for summer crops, especially potato and beet, although beet yields were generally below the record harvest of the previous year. These two crops, in particular beet, suffered from the excessive autumn rainfall in the north, which delayed harvests in most areas.

4.

Domestic demand for cereals is estimated to have risen 2.5%, after levelling off in 1999, due mainly to the resumption of cereal use in animal feed as cereals regained their competitive position in relation to substitutes. Before the BSE crisis, the forecast for beef and veal consumption in 2000 was for flat or limited growth compared with 1999, putting it slightly above the long-term trend (which, despite everything, was still on a downward curve - from over 23 kg per capita in 1986 to some 20 kg in 1999). The widespread loss of consumer confidence in the wake of the discovery of fresh cases of "mad cow disease", even in Member States which had hitherto been considered BSE-free, sparked a nosedive in beef and veal sales in most Member States, with some seeing falls of up to 60-70%. Averaged out over the year, it is estimated that the crisis will eventually be responsible for beef and veal consumption dropping by 5% in 2000, although significant fallout from the crisis could continue into 2001. As in the past, the slump in beef and veal sales has led to a corresponding increase in poultry and pigmeat consumption, which, according to estimates, was in decline somewhat before the BSE crisis. As a result, consumption levels for these meats should on the whole remain more or less flat in 2000 compared with the previous year, with poultry consumption perhaps dipping slightly. Lastly, while butter consumption fell off again after having picked up slightly in 1999, consumption of cheese continued its upward trend, growing by some 1.5% in 2000.

5.

The general economic scene was characterised by relatively steady growth in the European Union and the world at large, a steep fall in the euro against the dollar (increasing the competitiveness of Community exports in world markets), and rocketing oil prices, which, together with the weak euro, put upward pressure on inflation in most Member States

6.

Globally, agricultural markets continued their improvement on 1999, although in the context of recent years they remained relatively depressed. While world wheat prices, in particular, recovered in the second half of the year on the expectation of reduced stocks for the marketing year 2000-01, they were still down considerably on the record prices of 1994-96. In the maize sector, despite rallying in the second half of the year, world prices at the end of 2000 had done little more than return to their levels of the start of the year, having plummeted some 20% between May and July. Similarly, over the year world soya prices fluctuated around levels just slightly above those of the previous year, even though, as mentioned above, the depreciation of the euro against the dollar made Community grain and oilcake imports more expensive. World beef and veal prices were on an upward trend during 2000 as demand picked up, particularly in North America. Poultry prices, however, remained in the doldrums, depressed by a combination of increased supply and sluggish demand. In the global markets for milk products, cheese and butter prices rose slightly and those for skimmed milk powder steeply, following their sharp drop of recent years in the wake of the economic and financial crisis in Asia, Latin America and Russia.

7.

The solid overall performance of the European Union on world agricultural markets in 2000 (with the exception of some sectors, such as beef, veal and grain oils) can largely be attributed to the improvement in international markets and the weak euro boosting the competitiveness of Community exports. In the first ten months of 2000, the value of Community agricultural exports was up 13.6% on the same period in 1999. Cereal exports in particular increased by some 7% in volume and 27% in value, with Community exports of wheat and barley competitive enough to be made without export refunds in the second half of the year. The value of milk product exports also surged ahead (by more than 22.6% overall), especially milk powder (up 84.7%) and cheese (up 19.8%). The same was true of sugar (up 22.7%), fruit (up 25.7%), vegetables (up 7.2%), olive oil (up 46.9%) and wine (up 7.2%). Pigmeat exports, which had reached record levels in 1999, remained relatively constant in 2000 (up 0.6% in volume in the first ten months of the year, compared with the same period the previous year) but leapt in value (up 24.3%). Exports of poultrymeat moved ahead slightly (up 4.2% in value), while those of beef and veal lost more than 20% in both volume and value.

8.

On the whole, for most agricultural products covered by the intervention regime, intervention stocks fell considerably in 2000. This was especially true of cereals, with stock levels easing from a level of 14.9 million tonnes to 7.8 million tonnes in the eight months from the end of January 2000. While wheat and barley stocks were run down appreciably, stocks of rye, which did not dip below 3 million tonnes during the year, remained a cause for serious concern. Intervention stocks of milk powder practically disappeared in the first eight months of the year. Butter stocks, however, were mounting until May, after which they fell back slightly. Another development worthy of note was the big increase in rice stocks, which had breached the 700 thousand tonne mark by September 2000 as a result of mushrooming imports and internal production.

Output

9.

Cereal production hit new highs in 2000 (over 211 million tonnes), breaking the record levels of 1998, due to increases in the area under cultivation and in yields. The area under cereals grew by some 3% in 2000, linked to the fall in the area under oilseeds, protein crops and non-fibre flax. The move from oilseeds/protein crops to cereals can be partly explained by the relatively low prices for the latter in the 1999/2000 marketing year, but also by the disruption caused to winter cereal sowing in the previous year by poor soil conditions in certain regions. Of the different cereal crops, the area under common wheat grew by 6%, that under maize by 4.5% and that under rye by 7%.

10.

Cereal yields rose by 3% compared with 1999, reaching 5.7 t/ha on average, i.e. some 1% above the long-term trend. However, the pattern of development differed greatly from one Member State to another. For example, while yields leapt by over 30% in Spain and in Finland following 1999's disastrous results, they fell in Austria, Germany, Belgium and France as a result of less favourable weather than the previous year. The return to normal in Spain largely accounts for the big rises in average yields for durum wheat (17% up in the European Union as a whole) and barley (up 7%). Yields of common wheat rose slightly and those of maize fell somewhat.

Overall, cereal production was more than 11 million tonnes up on the previous year (i.e. some 6%). About half of this rise was accounted for by common wheat, with the other half being feed grains (in particular barley).

11.

After 1999's record harvest, total oilseed production (rape, sunflower and soya) fell off by 15% in 2000 as a result of the smaller area under cultivation (8% down) and lower yields (7% down). Most of the overall drop in oilseeds production could be attributed to the fall in rape production (down 24%) as a result of the smaller cultivated area (down 13%) and lower yields (down 11%). Sunflower production, however, rose by 11%, driven by a big increase in yields in Spain following 1999's catastrophic drought-affected harvest. Overall the area under sunflowers remained the same. Soya production was 5% down on the previous year.

12.

Protein crop output also fell in 2000 (by 15%), due to a smaller area under cultivation and lower yields, reaching its lowest level since 1995. In addition, non-fibre flax production fell by almost half from the previous year's level as the area under cultivation returned to normal following spectacular increases the previous year in the United Kingdom and Germany.

13.

Following substantial growth in 1999, sugar production was estimated to have fallen by over 5% in 2000 as the area under beet declined steeply (down 7.3% on 1999) in anticipation of the cuts in production quotas and also as a result of less favourable world export markets. However, generally favourable climatic conditions for beet, at least up to the harvest period, ensured that sugar yields in 2000 were relatively high in spite of the smaller area planted. In several regions, however, harvesting was disrupted by heavy rainfall, leading to a somewhat lower sugar yield.

14.

Early estimates (as of mid-January 2001) put olive oil production in 2000 at some 1.9 million tonnes, an increase of around 12% on the previous year.

15.

Early estimates have production of both fruit (-2.5% on 1999) and vegetables (- 2.0%) down in 2000. Potato output is estimated to have remained more or less stable compared with the previous year.

16.

Following an exceptional harvest in 1999, up by some 20 million hectolitres on the previous year, wine production fell again in 2000 (down 8% approximately) to around 165 million hectolitres. Big falls were seen in Austria and Portugal (some 25% in each), Germany (around 13%), France (9%) and Italy (8%). Spanish wine production, on the other hand, was estimated to have risen by 7% following its decline the year before.

17.

While beef and veal production was continuing to grow in 2000 before the new BSE crisis broke, and up slightly on the previous year, the collapse in consumption in the last months of the year - despite the measures taken to strengthen existing consumer protection arrangements - led to an estimated fall in slaughterings, and thus in production, of some 5% for the year as a whole. Similarly, while per-capita consumption of beef and veal seemed to have recovered completely from its post-1996 falls in the wake of the first BSE crisis, it was hit again at the end of the year, especially in those Member States in whose national herd BSE was detected for the first time.

18.

Pigmeat production was estimated to have fallen by 2.5% following strong growth in recent years and the price falls of 1998 and 1999. However, the impetus given to white meat consumption by the BSE crisis had by the end of the year curtailed the overall fall in pigmeat production (- 1.8% for the year).

19.

The long upward trend in poultrymeat production was halted in 1999 due partly to lower export growth and partly to the impact on consumption of the dioxin crisis that hit Belgium in spring 1999. Fresh falls in output were forecast for 2000, in the wake of the previous year's falls. As with pigmeat, however, output fell less than initially anticipated (some 1.1% down for the year) due to the revival of poultrymeat consumption as a result of the BSE crisis.

20.

After recovering in 1998 from falls the previous year, production in the sheepmeat and goatmeat sectors more or less stabilised in 1999 and 2000 at levels well down on those of the early 1990s.

21.

While the Community dairy herd is still shrinking by around 1.5% a year, milk production for 2000 should be around the 122 million tonne mark, i.e. more or less unchanged from 1999, although that year's output was up one million tonnes on the previous year. Yields are still growing and generally offsetting the fall in the size of the herd. Deliveries to dairies were also flat or even slightly down on the previous year, although reference quantities were increased for a number of Member States under the Agenda 2000 package. However, the impact of these measures had probably been felt already in the 1999 deliveries.

22.

After the increases posted the previous year, butter production is estimated to have turned down again in 2000 (by 1.2% according to initial estimates), in parallel with the fall in domestic consumption and despite the recovery of exports from the previous year's difficulties on the Russian market. Cheese production, however, rose by 2.3%, boosted both by rising domestic consumption and export growth. Production of skimmed milk powder fell off heavily in 2000 (- 5%) following the previous year's rise.

Producer prices and market prices

23.

According to the figures available at the end of December 2000, the index of farm-gate prices was estimated to have grown in 2000 by an average of 2.9% in nominal terms compared with the previous year, fuelled by a 7.7% increase in the price of animal products (compared with the previous year's fall), as against a 1.5% drop in crop prices. It should however be pointed out that these estimates probably do not take full account of the impact of the beef price collapse in the wake of the new BSE crisis. The steepest drops in crop prices were recorded by potatoes (down 19.5%), wine (down 5.3%), rice (down 4.3%) and fresh fruit (down 2.0%). Falls were also registered by cereals (down 1.5%), sugar beet (down 1.7%) and dried pulses (down 1.4%). This trend was bucked by fresh vegetable prices, which improved slightly (up 2.6%). As regards animal products, pigmeat prices (as already mentioned) leapt by 25.0% following their fall the previous year. Significant rises were also recorded for beef and veal (up 2.0%), mutton and lamb (up 5.1%), poultry (up 7.0%) and milk (up 2.6%). Egg prices also leapt upwards by 20.0%.

24.

After accounting for inflation, the producer price index for the European Union as a whole was estimated to have risen by 0.6% on the previous year. The biggest rises were in Belgium (up 6.3%), Denmark (up 7.2%), Germany (up 7.6%) and the Netherlands (up 7.2%), i.e. those Member States in which the recovery of pigmeat prices from the previous year's falls had the greatest effect on overall prices. Farm-gate prices also rose slightly in Greece (up 1.0%), Ireland (up 1.3%) and Austria, while holding more or less steady in France in real terms. Real producer prices fell, however, in Spain (by 2.4%) Italy (1.6%), Luxembourg (3.5%), Portugal (1.1%), Finland (1.8%), Sweden (2.9%) and the United Kingdom (4.7%).

25.

Having bottomed out at the beginning of the 1999/2000 marketing year, cereals prices made modest gains up to May 2000, as intervention stocks were wound down (from 18 million to some 9 million tonnes over the marketing year from start to finish) through a combination of increased exports and greater internal demand, in particular for feed grains. From June onwards, however, cereal prices in the Community slumped as prospects firmed for a record cereals harvest. The fall was, however, exacerbated by the entry into force on 1 July 2000 of the cuts (of some 7.5%) in intervention prices decided under Agenda 2000, although this downward pressure on prices was attenuated somewhat by an increase in assistance levels (from EUR 54.34/t to EUR 58.67/t).

26.

The cuts in intervention prices were fully reflected in market prices. However, the picture varies appreciably from one Member State to the other and between different types of cereal. While in France, for example, prices for common wheat remained at relatively low levels just above the intervention price because of the poor quality of bread wheat, Italian and German market prices for this cereal recovered steadily to reach a level comfortably above the intervention price at the year end. Similarly, French barley prices surged ahead early in the marketing year on the back of a comparatively poor harvest of brewing barley, whereas increases in Spain and Germany were much more muted. Lastly, although still below 1999 levels, maize prices remained well above intervention prices in most producer Member States.

27.

Olive oil prices remained relatively depressed throughout 2000, with Spanish and Greek extra-virgin even dipping below the trigger rate for private storage as the new harvest, higher than in the previous year, was brought in. In Italy, however, rates for both extra-virgin and lampante remained above this level.

28.

Wine prices continued to fall from the levels of the previous year. At the beginning of January 2001, compared with the same period the previous year, market rates for red wine were down by 4% in Italy, 10% in France and 37% in Spain; white wine prices had fallen by 3% in Italy, 7% in France and 27% in Spain.

29.

Butter prices remained relatively depressed (fluctuating between 90 and 93% of the intervention price) during the first part of the year. From June they picked up, however, finishing the year at a level close to the intervention price, having even exceeded this level during the autumn. Skimmed milk powder prices increased markedly in the first six months of the year as intervention stocks were gradually run down to zero by August 2000 by the sharp increase in demand, especially on world markets. Thereafter, they more or less stabilised at relatively high levels. Cheese prices were also higher than the previous year.

30.

Before the new BSE crisis broke, prices on beef and veal markets had been relatively stable, at levels comfortably above previous years and - in the case of cows - even rising steadily. From October onwards, however - following the discovery of fresh cases of BSE, in particular in France, Belgium, Germany and Italy - the beef and veal market collapsed abruptly in the face of tumbling domestic consumption. For example, prices for adult bovines fell by some 14% in November and December 2000, young bovines by 14% and cows by over 20% (in some Member States ending the year at levels close to the "safety net" value - between 60 and 70% of the intervention price).

31.

The poultry market made a strong recovery in 2000, after its collapse the previous year when consumers abandoned poultry in reaction to the contamination of poultry feed by dioxin. Near the year end, moreover, prices were given a fillip by the BSE crisis and the resultant increase in demand for white meats. Chicken prices, in particular, rose by an average of more than 8% in the last two months of the year.

32.

Driven by falling output and rising demand, pigmeat prices improved markedly throughout 2000, following the previous year's falls. At the end of 2000, prices were up some 30% on those of twelve months earlier.

33.

The markets for sheep- and goatmeat products remained buoyant throughout 2000, well in excess of the previous year when they had been depressed by rising production in the United Kingdom and Ireland. The recovery was particularly strong after the summer, with prices rising some 25% between August and December.

Input prices

34.

In 2000, the index of purchase prices for staple goods and services in agriculture was up by an average of 5.8% in nominal terms on the previous year. The biggest rises were in energy (up 25.4%, mainly due to soaring oil prices), livestock (up 13.5%), fertilisers (up 6.5%) and feedingstuffs (up 3.4%).

35.

When account is taken of inflation, the real increase in the index of purchase prices for staple goods and services in agriculture since 1999 was 3.7% for the European Union as a whole. Above-average rises were recorded in Belgium (up 5.6%), Germany (up 7.9%), Finland (up 4.1%), Sweden (up 4.1%) and the Netherlands (up 3.9%). The input price index was also up in Greece (by 3.2%), Spain (2.0%), France (3.3%), Austria (2.6%), Portugal (1.9%) and the United Kingdom (2.2%), and more or less stable in Denmark and Italy.

Farm income1

36.

Eurostat's initial estimates, based on information received by Member States as at mid-December 2000 and using the new agricultural accounting methods, put average farm income across the European Union as a whole 1.3% up on the previous year. Income was up in Belgium (by 12.2%), Denmark (24.1%), Germany (6.9%), Spain (4.6%), France (1.3%), Ireland (6.5%), the Netherlands (3.7%), Finland (22.0%) and Sweden (4.9%). Italy (down 4.3%), Austria (down 4.8%), Portugal (down 7.5%) and the United Kingdom (down 10.8%), on the other hand, all recorded contractions in farm income. Income levels in Greece and in Luxembourg remained stable.


Changes in nominal farm-gate prices in 2000* and 1999

(%)  
Member state

2000*/1999

1999/1998

Crop
products

Livestock products

TOTAL

Crop
products

Livestock products

TOTAL

EU-15

-1,5

7,7

2,9

-2,4

-4,6

-3,4

Belgique/België

0,7

15,1

9,2

-5,1

-9,1

-7,4

Danmark

6,5

12,0

10,2

-3,6

-4,7

-4,3

Deutschland

-2,2

9,4

5,4

-3,0

-5,6

-4,7

Elláda

2,8

6,0

3,7

-1,0

3,5

0,2

España

-3,4

9,0

0,9

1,6

-6,3

-1,3

France

-1,7

5,3

1,8

-3,3

-3,8

-3,5

Ireland

-2,0

7,7

6,5

-2,0

-4,6

-4,2

Italia

-2,5

6,8

1,1

-3,5

-3,2

-3,4

Luxembourg

1,3

-0,6

0,2

-0,1

-2,1

-1,7

Nederland

3,6

15,8

9,6

-5,6

-9,8

-7,6

Österreich

0,9

5,9

4,6

-1,8

-3,6

-3,2

Portugal

-5,2

10,7

1,7

-5,2

-4,1

-4,7

Suomi/Finland

-2,7

3,3

1,0

-1,1

-2,3

-2,0

Sverige

-9,5

2,7

-1,6

9,7

-7,4

-2,8

United Kingdom

-7,8

-0,8

-3,5

-4,1

-3,5

-3,7

*2. 2000 forecasts

Source : Eurostat


Changes in nominal purchase prices for agricultural inputs in 2000* and 1999

(%)  
Member state

Intermediate
consumption

Investment

Total

2000*/1999

1999/1998

2000*/1999

1999/1998

2000*/1999

1999/1998

EU-15

5,8

-1,4

1,7

1,0

4,7

-0,7

Belgique/België

8,4

-1,2

-0,4

1,8

7,1

-0,7

Danmark

2,8

-1,5

1,3

2,2

2,5

-0,7

Deutschland

10,0

-0,9

0,9

0,8

7,6

-0,4

Elláda

6,0

0,6

1,9

1,9

5,2

0,9

España

5,6

-1,3

4,3

-0,7

-0,8

-1,2

France

5,2

-1,8

1,4

1,1

4,3

-1,2

Ireland

5,4

0,7

4,1

1,7

5,3

1,0

Italia

2,9

-1,7

1,5

0,9

2,2

-0,4

Luxembourg

6,6

-0,9

0,9

1,7

4,1

0,3

Nederland

6,3

-2,1

3,0

2,3

5,4

-1,0

Österreich

4,5

-2,4

0,8

1,0

2,8

-0,9

Portugal

4,4

-1,1

4,8

1,3

4,7

-0,5

Suomi/Finland

7,1

-2,0

2,5

0,7

5,9

-1,1

Sverige

5,5

-0,7

2,2

0,7

4,7

-0,4

United Kingdom

3,2

-2,0

1,3

1,1

2,8

-1,5

*2. 2000 forecasts

Source : Eurostat


Real producer price indices

(1990=100)  
  1990

1991

1992

1993

1994

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000*

EU-15

100

97,2

89,1

84,6

84,8

85,2

83,0

80,0

76,6

72,8

73,1

Belgique/België

100

98,1

92,3

83,8

84,8

79,4

79,2

79,2

74,6

68,3

72,6

Danmark

100

96,2

92,8

80,0

79,5

77,8

77,3

76,0

66,7

62,6

67,1

Deutschland

100

95,2

91,2

80,6

79,5

78,7

76,8

76,1

71,1

67,3

72,4

Elláda

100

100,6

90,5

84,3

87,5

87,8

86,5

84,7

80,9

79,3

80,1

España

100

94,9

83,5

84,1

88,8

94,1

90,5

84,8

81,7

78,9

77,0

France

100

97,6

88,2

81,8

80,7

80,2

78,6

78,0

77,6

74,5

74,5

Ireland

100

93,4

91,9

96,7

95,8

95,6

89,3

82,5

79,9

74,6

75,6

Italia

100

102,8

89,8

87,8

87,5

90,9

89,2

87,4

85,3

81,1

79,8

Luxembourg

100

89,6

82,3

78,0

75,9

73,6

71,0

71,4

69,6

67,8

65,4

Nederland

100

100,8

92,1

83,4

84,2

84,9

84,8

87,1

81,8

74,1

79,4

Österreich

100

97,1

92,5

87,3

85,5

63,2

62,7

63,4

58,5

56,6

58,1

Portugal

100

87,3

74,3

71,3

73,8

72,2

69,8

64,4

66,9

62,2

61,5

Suomi/Finland

100

92,5

89,6

87,7

86,6

63,9

54,4

53,0

51,8

50,2

49,3

Sverige

100

91,5

86,4

79,3

81,6

79,8

76,2

73,5

74,7

72,2

70,1

United Kingdom

100

93,7

91,9

95,2

93,3

98,2

94,4

79,1

69,6

66,1

63,0

*2. 2000 forecasts

Source : Eurostat


Indices of real purchase prices for staple goods and services in agriculture

(1990=100)  
  1990

1991

1992

1993

1994

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000*

EU-15

100

97,4

95,0

93,4

91,3

90,9

92,2

90,9

86,4

84,1

87,2

Belgique/België

100

97,1

94,5

91,0

88,5

87,4

89,4

89,7

84,4

82,4

87,0

Danmark

100

96,7

94,1

92,7

89,0

87,6

88,6

88,7

85,5

82,8

82,6

Deutschland

100

98,3

96,0

91,9

90,0

88,5

89,8

89,9

85,0

83,7

90,3

Elláda

100

101,7

99,2

96,5

97,4

94,2

94,6

92,0

87,8

86,4

89,2

España

100

96,1

92,0

91,1

89,5

88,4

88,7

89,0

86,4

83,4

85,1

France

100

97,9

96,2

94,2

92,6

92,6

94,4

94,9

91,6

89,5

92,5

Ireland

100

97,3

94,3

93,0

91,7

90,8

92,7

90,0

86,1

84,6

84,7

Italia

100

95,9

92,8

95,6

93,1

97,9

97,0

93,2

89,1

86,1

86,4

Luxembourg

100

98,7

96,0

91,4

89,5

89,0

91,1

90,4

87,4

85,8

88,1

Nederland

100

96,9

95,2

90,9

87,5

88,7

91,0

89,3

84,8

81,3

84,5

Österreich

100

98,8

96,3

93,7

88,8

84,8

87,5

89,7

86,0

83,5

85,7

Portugal

100

94,5

89,3

79,7

79,1

76,0

73,4

69,0

65,4

63,4

64,6

Suomi/Finland

100

102,8

102,4

102,0

96,6

74,7

75,9

77,0

73,9

71,6

74,5

Sverige

100

95,4

92,9

88,4

88,1

90,8

96,6

98,2

96,5

95,3

99,2

United Kingdom

100

97,5

97,2

99,9

97,0

97,0

101,0

93,4

83,9

81,1

82,9

*2. 2000 forecasts

Source : Eurostat



1

A more detailed analysis of trends in farm incomes in 2000 can be found in Eurostat's booklet Statistics in Focus - Theme 5 22/2000.
2

Measured by net value added at factor cost per unit of work.


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